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Using a grinder setup for polishing


#1

Hello. I have a delta-type grinder (with a light) that I would
like to use for polishing. You can take the grinding stones that
came with the setup off and put something else on the arbor. I
have found polishing buffs that are designed for this. The nice
thing is that there is a built-in hole on the bottom part of the
housing that you could connect a vacuum to. I would just like to
know how feasible a setup this is. It would serve a dual purpose
and take up a lot less space. Please reply.

Marshall Jones
@Marshall_Jones


#2

I don�t know much about horsepower etc and I�ll let those more
knowledgeable answer that part. Although you can take the stone
off and find buffs with big holes, they will need some sort of
fastening to keep them on. If you replace them with tapered
spindles which you can find in most jewelry supply catalogs, It
will make it much faster and easier to change buffs. You will
want to change buffs so that you can use a variety of sizes,
shapes and types. Marilyn Smith


#3

Check the archives. There was a long thread on this just
recently

There is absolutely no substitute for a genuine lack of preparation.

Bobert


#4

Marshal, go for it . I used a simular set up for years. You can
buy spindels from most jewelry tool supply houses for a few
dollars. Vernon


#5
  don�t know much about horsepower etc and I�ll let those more
knowledgeable answer that part. Although you can take the
stone off and find buffs with big holes, they will need some
sort of fastening to keep them on. If you replace them with
tapered spindles which you can find in most jewelry supply
catalogs, It will make it much faster and easier to change
buffs. You will want to change buffs so that you can use a
variety of sizes, shapes and types.

Sorry to use your note in my reply, Marilyn.

Horse power. I have 1/3 HP, and I purchased a grinder type
motor from Sears (I’ll post the model number if necessary.) What
one HAS to do is cut off the threads after removing the grinding
wheels (and the guards which come with the thing.) Cutting off
the threads was not a big deal. I used a hack saw with a metal
cutting blade (white one from Sears.) and the threads were off
in less than 15 minutes! DO NOT START CUTTING WHERE THE SHAFT
COMES FROM THE MOTOR!!! You won’t have anything to attach the
spindle to!!!

(The guy at Sears tried to tell me that I wouldn’t be able to
cut the shaft!!! hahahaha! - so If they try to tell you the same
thing they told me,do not believe them!)

I purchased 1/2" spindles (you need to measure the shaft which
extends from inside the motor . . . it’s not a difficult thing to
do) THE IMPORTANT thing is: Order a RIGHT and LEFT spindle . .
. there is a difference when the things start to spin! The
spindles I use came from Thunderbird (our local supplier didn’t
have two of the same length!) These are only around $5.00 a
piece.

Happy (almost) New Year! Wishing all a Healthy, Happy and
Profitable year!!!


#6
 What one HAS to do is cut off the threads after removing the
grinding    wheels (and the guards which come with the thing.)

Not necessarily so! Threaded tapered spindles are also
available. Just be sure to order ones for the shaft size of your
motor. Most light weight grinders (under 1HP) have 1/2" diameter
shafts. The other popular size is 5/8".

Dave


#7
Horse power.  I have 1/3 HP, and I purchased a grinder type
motor from Sears (I'll post the model number if necessary.)  What
one HAS to do is cut off the threads after removing the grinding
wheels (and the guards which come with the thing.)  Cutting off
the threads was not a big deal.  I used a hack saw with a metal
cutting blade (white one from Sears.) and the threads were off
in less than 15 minutes!  DO NOT START CUTTING WHERE THE SHAFT
COMES FROM THE MOTOR!!!  You won't have anything to attach the
spindle to!!!

If you had turned on the motor you could have had them off in
about 2 minutes. I have done this also with a 1/2 hp grinder
from Home Depot. It works quite well.

Lester…


#8
      If you had turned on the motor you could have had them
off in about 2 minutes.  I have done this also with a 1/2 hp
grinder from Home Depot. It works quite well. 

I considered doing that, but just the thought scared me! ; )


#9
 Not necessarily so! Threaded tapered spindles are also
available. Just be sure to order ones for the shaft size of
your motor. Most light weight grinders (under 1HP) have 1/2"
diameter shafts. The other popular size is 5/8".  

I tried the spindles without cutting off the threads . . . the
problem I encountered was that the spindles extended to the sides
of my dust collector rendering the dust collector totally
useless.


#10

It really isn’t all that bad, just be careful with the hacksaw.
Be sure the rotation is into the sawblade. Do not get the blade
sideways while cutting, and have everything clamped down
tightly…

Lester…


#11

Please explain the fast and scary method and the slow but
tranquil method of turning a Home Depot grinder into a jeweller’s
grinder- polisher. I eyed those last month at Home Depot and
thought - Hmmm. I wonder if… And then this thread began.
Is synchonicity or chaos?


#12

Hi

I turned an old grinder into a polisher a few weeks back. I do
some hobby type polishing on a non-commercial basis. If I were
doing a large volume of work I would have bought a machine
designed for that purpose. An enclosed unit would be great.

Anyway, here is my thought. Take off the grinding wheels and
note the threaded shaft size, (1 / 2 or 5 / 8 ). From Rio,
Tripps or whereever, buy a right and a left threaded tapered
spindle. Place them on the correct shaft and tighten the set
screw down on the threaded shaft. You can if you like, drill a
recess in the shaft for the set screw to rest in. I find it not
necessary if you check the set screw for tightness often. You
can buy buffs of all types to fit these spindles. I cut out a
card board box to cover the unit and cut down on dust residue. I
vaccuum the bax often as the rouge is quite invasive.

Hope this helps some. Good buffing!

Bob B


#13
   Please explain the fast and scary method ...of turning a
Home Depot grinder into a jeweller's grinder- polisher. 

The fast method is meerly clamping the grinder down, either by
screws in the base or large “C” clamps. Then taking a hack
saw/plumber’s saw with a metal cutting blade in it, turning ON
the grinder and start cutting at the beginning of the threads.
If you move the saw back and forth, it will cut faster. Hack
saws usually cut on the push stroke so the shaft should be
turning into the saw blade(you can set them up to cut on the pull
stroke by turning the blade around). The only problem with this
way of doing it is getting the saw blade sideways and binding
it, NOT good. It works something like a metal lathe. You can
then dress the ends with a file, while the grinder is still
turning.

Lester…

P.S. - As with all power equipment use caution, no long hair,
shirt sleeves, wear eye protection etc., etc.


#14
  Please explain the fast and scary method and the slow but
tranquil method of turning a Home Depot grinder into a
jeweller's grinder- polisher.  I eyed those last month at Home
Depot and thought - Hmmm. I wonder if......    And then this
thread began. Is synchonicity or chaos? 

OK, starting from scratch. You have a grinder . . .Does it have
guards around the wheels??? If the answer is YES, you will have
to remove the wheels and the guards . . .unscrew all the screws
holding the guards and unscrew the bolts holding the wheels. If
done correctly, you should have the motor with two arms (the
shaft) on either side of the motor.

Take a hack saw and saw off the threads on the shaft (there
should be threads on the right and the left side of the motor.)
DO NOT SAW OFF THE ENTIRE SHAFT!!!

Now, note the diameter of the shaft, order a LEFT and a RIGHT
spindle from your favorite vendor. THEY WILL SPECIFY LEFT AND
RIGHT. When they arrive, put the left spindle on the left side
of the shaft, then put the right spindle on the right side of the
shaft.

I found that spindles with a screw to tighten rather than having
threads inside , were easier to apply . . . I didn’t have to know
whether the shaft was spinning toward or away from me.

As far as the electrical attachment . . . I couldn’t find a way
to attach the electrical part, so I merely left the plug alone, I
put the motor in the space provided in the Dust cabinet. I then,
plugged in the motor and turn that on separately after I turn on
the dust collector.

Oh, my motor had lights over the wheel guards, I simply snipped
those off, and wrapped the ends near the base of the motor in
electrical tape . . . my dust collector has built in lights so
the others were useless to me.

Have fun!


#15
   Please explain the fast and scary method and the slow but    
tranquil method of turning a Home Depot grinder into a
jeweller's     grinder- polisher.  

I presume the ones you have in the States are the same as the ones
we have in the UK if so the process is really quite simple {it had
to be for me to understand it!! :wink: } You simply remove the
protective side covers as if you were changing the grinder wheel,
then remove the wheel and all its washers and nuts then simply put
one of the tapered spindles which I’m sure you can buy from Rio
Grande. You do need to ensure that you buy the correct size
spindle, over here they are available in 1/2 inch or 5/8 inch so
carefully measure the spindle. that really is all there is to it. I
also have made a surround initially from a corrugated carboard box
to trap the dust, in the wall behind the unit I have installed an
extractor fan which is wired in to the same plug as the grinder so
that as soon as I switch it on it always starts extracting the
dust. One day I’ll get around to making a more substantial surround
with perspex or something equally fancy but the box does fine for
now and costs nothing to replace or alter which I have had to do to
get it just right!

Your Philip.


#16
   also have made a surround initially from a corrugated
carboard box to trap the dust, in the wall behind the unit I have
installed an extractor fan which is wired in to the same plug as
the grinder so that as soon as I switch it on it always starts
extracting the dust. One day I'll get around to making a more
substantial >surround with perspex or something equally fancy but
the box does fine for now and costs nothing to replace or alter
which I have had to do to 

HI Phlip,…I just wanted to add a suggestion that I have
found helpul in a dust catcher. Place a very shallow pan under the
wheel and back into the box. Keep this pan filled with water and it
traps the dust before it flies around. It is NOT a substitute for
the box which is still very important.

Sol K.
@solk1