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Used tools


#1

I bought an old grinding wheel motor at a yard sale for $10.00.
I thought that you can replace the spindel that holds the
grinding wheel with a taper that holds buffing (et al.) wheels. I
though it comes off with an allen wrench. Am I totally
misinformed? Also, all the info on how to start a home studio
was great. I am putting together a studio and like everyone
else-need to keep costs down. Does anyone know where I might find
used jewelry tools anywhere? …in Phila? I am going to South
Florida soon, too. Janet B.


#2

If you?re starting a studio have you read ?Cheap Thrills in the
Tool Shop? by charles Lewton-Brain. He has ideas for creating
equipment from things other than ready mades.

Marilyn Smith

#3
  I bought an old grinding wheel motor at a yard sale for
$10.00. I thought that you can replace the spindel that holds
the grinding wheel with a taper that holds buffing (et al.)
wheels. I though it comes off with an allen wrench. 

You were not misinformed. IF you have a dust collector . …
the length of the original shaft (onto which the spindles are
placed) WILL NOT FIT some of the dust collectors if not shortened
(via cutting off the threads) and then putting the spindle (yes,
with an allen wrench) if there is a screw in the spindle! ***
am I making any sense at all?*** ; )


#4

Hello,

You should be able to adapt that motor to a tapered end without
removing the threaded piece that came with the grinder. You can
get the diameter of the end piece and then buy an adapter
through many mail order supply houses. I know Kingsley North
sells these things for under 10 dollars. I have another
suggestion: You could buy an inexpensive arbor, consisting of
nothing more than two pillow block bearings and a rod going
between them. In the middle is a pulley. You mount the motor
to your bench, connect a pulley to the center of the rod, and
you now have a great little tool that can be used for lots of
things. You can buy the set up for less than 20 dollars, also
from Kingsley North, of Mich. Hope this helps.


#5

Janet

Usually you buy a tapered spindle (about $5 ) from Rio, Tripps
or ? It fits right over the shaft on your motor and then
tightens with a set screw. Make sure you get a right or left as
needed and get the right diameter (1/2 or 5/8). These accept the
buffs you want to use.

Bob B

Other info needed? Ask .


#6
I bought an old grinding wheel motor at a yard sale for $10.00.
I thought that you can replace the spindel that holds the
grinding wheel with a taper that holds buffing (et al.) wheels. I
though it comes off with an allen wrench. Am I totally
misinformed? 

The shaft will not come out of the motor. You will need to cut
off the threaded area on both ends of the shaft using a hacksaw
where the threads start. Then you can order two tapered shafts
adapters, one right hand and one left hand making sure the i.d.
of the adapters match the o.d. of the shaft. They are attached
using allen screws to the portion of shaft left sticking out on
either end, so that buff tighten up on the shaft when the motor
is on.

That should be all there is.

Lester…


#7
    You will need to cutoff the threaded area on both ends of
the shaft using a hacksaw where the threads start.  Then you
can order two tapered shafts adapters, one right hand and one
left hand making sure the i.d. of the adapters match the o.d. of
the shaft.  

I converted a home depot grinder into a buffer. In case I wanted
to also use it as it was intended, I made an adapter instead of
removing the threads . The adapter was made from a piece of mild
steel 5" long and .75" dia. One end was drilled and reamed .500
dia deep enough to slide over the threads and two holes were
drilled and tapped for set screws. The other end was turned to
.500 dia long enough to accept the tapered shaft and a flat was
milled on it to provide a seat for the set screws.

I also made a piece that was 5" long with a .500 dia thru hole.
Four holes were drilled and tapped for set screws. I use this
adapter to hold a small Jacob’s chuck that has a .500 straight
shank. this works great for flex shaft tools when it is easier to
move your

work than the tool. all I need to do now is encase the unit in
sheet metal with a duct for a shop vac.

Steve D.


#8

Hi Everybody

I have been reading the threads on using a motor for polishing
and fitting tapers to the shaft. Can I make two suggestions with
a view to safety.

  1. When fitting the tapers in place mark the shaft with the
    Allan screw. Take the taper off and drill the shaft where the
    Allan screw has marked the same diameter as the Allan screw and
    about 2 m/m deep or a little more. This will allow the top of the
    Allan screw to go below the surface of the boss of the taper and
    will also allow the removal of the taper as it will not jam on
    the shaft where the screw makes it’s mark.

  2. Drill and tap a second Allan screw hole at 90 degrees to the
    threaded hole that you have. This gives you the added advantage
    of the screws working in two directions to hold the taper. Then
    do the same as above. The same goes for pulleys that have no
    keyway to drive them

Major Boyce @pyramid

The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you
cannot do.

EVERYBODY has a talent. What is rare is the courage to follow
that talent to the dark place where it leads.


#9
I have been reading the threads on using a motor for polishing
and fitting tapers to the shaft. Can I make two suggestions with
a view to safety.
Here's one more.......

#3 after attaching the adapter to the shaft wrap the set screws
with electrical tape in case they back out. BE SURE TO CHECK
FOR TIGHTNESS OFTEN!!!


#10
 BE SURE TO CHECK  FOR TIGHTNESS OFTEN!!! 

I’ve heard that one should drop a bit of CRAZY glue on the set
screws to keep them from loosening. I don’t know if that works
or not . . . and gee, it’s been over a years since I installed
the tapers, maybe it’s time for me to check!?!


#11
I've heard that one should drop a bit of CRAZY glue on the set
screws to keep them from loosening. 

Crazy glue, Super Glue, et. al. are too brittle for this, IMHO.
Try using Loc-tite, or other similar product, which is designed
for this very purpose. It is obtainable in very small tubes
from some hardware stores, at least here in the US.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, TN