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"True" wax build up for models?


#1

Is anyone out there using a “cold” needle and an alcohol lamp to
make models. I can do things like insect legs and pulled cooling wax
that can’t be done any other way. One cannot, CANNOT get even similar
results with an electric pin. I use biology teasing needles. I see
books on wax modeling, but none show this. Should I produce a book?
Very unique things can be done this way.

Jay


#2
Should I produce a book? Very unique things can be done this way. 

Yes, please.

Noel


#3

Actually, I just read a very good book that includes this technique,
at least for working with pins and an alchohol lamp to connect pieces
together and do decoration. I have an electric wax worker, but I’m a
novice and find it frustrating. I plan on buying some denatured
alchohol and a lamp and trying it this way. As for the book, I found
it to be the best book I have read yet about wax modeling for
beginners. I plan on purchasing my own copy eventually. The book is
by Hiroshi Tsuyuki (it is printed in Japan) and it is called Basic Wax
Modeling: An Adventure in Creativity.

Augest Derenthal
Cry Baby Designs


#4

Jay,

What is a biology teasing needle? I use basic tools to carve and drip
and I use an alcohol lamp for a lot of my carvings. I also use a very
specific red wax (I think it’s Sierra Red injection wax) for a lot of
my build up and “dripping”. Melting point is lower than most of the
hard carving waxes. And, you can buildup a lot easier. Detail is
tougher, though.

As a matter of fact, I’m gonna do some carving right now!

Amery


#5

Jay:

That’s the way I learned wax model making except that I use reshaped
dental tools. My instructor could make anything out of a pot of scrap
wax. I plan to discuss that approach along with other methods in an
upcoming book, but let me know if you get there first.

Fred


#6

Hi Jay,

Red rag to a bull to say cannot, there is always someone…

I modified one of those cauterising wax tools, the kind with a
single 1.5volt battery in, I added a bit of 0.3mm silver wire to the
end and then because it was still a bit hot and ATE batteries! got a
power supply for a pyrography tool, a set of resistors to cut down
the heat, and built a new handle with a microswitch under my index
finger.

I can produce 0.3mm wax dots all day no stopping to reheat. I work
under a microscope, which I think is a great boon. I also thought
about producing a book! We all have methods we think are the bees
knees. Why don’t we both do it? any interested publishers out there?

Tim.


#7
I can produce 0.3mm wax dots all day no stopping to reheat. 

Can you build wax wire? even if uneven?


#8

A teasing needle is to separate tissues during dissection. It has a
nice long plastic handle and needle already inserted, no need to make
one. I do carve, but originally it did it all with the needle. I
guess I’m going to have to show you guys some pictures about things
you can’t carve to obtain.

Jay


#9

Dear Augest,

Thank you. I will check on that book. I have to sympathize with your
effort, because I think books limit what we can do without actually
seeing a demonstration. Be aware that you can pull the wax as it
cools and make a stream. I do that and add to it and then shape by
removing bits with the hot needle. I saw someone demonstrate this at
a Swest workshop and came home and did it. i’ll try and send you a
picture or 2 of possibilities.

Jay


#10
The book is by Hiroshi Tsuyuki (it is printed in Japan) and it is
called Basic Wax Modeling: An Adventure in Creativity. 

Amazon lists it, but says it is out of print, unavailable. My
library doesn’t have it. Abebooks (rare, used, etc books) doesn’t
either, though they have another title by the same author-- for
$135.

Noel


#11

There are two books by Tsuyuki on wax, the Practical Wax modeling is
$135 even used, however there is another that is called Basic Wax
modeling for bout 30 and 35. I use Bookfinders.com for all book
searches…


#12

Thanks everyone for this interesting post on wax. Love it.

Tim - any way you can make a diagram of your new tool? I’m working
on a project where I could use .3 wax dots!

Thanks,
Janet


#13
Can you build wax wire? even if uneven? 

I had a go this afternoon, it took a bit of time to get the
temperature right but yes, you build up a pile of round top meltings
of wax and then run the end of the tool up the sides to smooth it
off. It was a bit uneven I could do with a lot more practice. It was
0.5 mm wide and 10mm long, a few minutes work, I suppose I would get
faster. If I had to do a lot I would extrude some with a glue gun,
turn down the power and use matt extruding wax, weld the bits in
place.

The thing I like is that I am working in the same wax as the model,
in this case green carving wax, then when you recarve the surface is
not radically softer or different in texture. Also for example I made
a little umbrella model with little triangle for folded fabric 30mm
long, I could weld down inside the lengths of the sections with
little danger of melting bits I didn’t want to. It is very useful for
filling in those odd air bubbles you always find just under the
surface in a crucial place.

I accept that doing it with a hot needle is I am sure more skilled,
I just think that for very small work heat control makes it easier. I
personally think that using a microscope makes the most difference,
just by letting you see what you are doing.

By the way I must credit Mr Mattiello in Jewelry Wax Carving with
the tip about the bit of thin wire to make a fine welding point, this
is a book that goes to the limit of hand carving skills.

Tim Blades.


#14
Tim - any way you can make a diagram of your new tool? I'm working
on a project where I could use .3 wax dots! 

Yes please, Tim. Or, ever thought of mfg the tool and selling it to
us on Orchid?

-Amery


#15

I think you meant the web address to be bookfinder.com or
bookfinder4u.com. You might find a modeling video at bookfinders.com
but not many books, especially a jewelry model making for lost wax
casting book.


#16

Over the years I have done quite a bit of wax models, usually rings
but some more elaborate such as a 'flowed metal" look for an open
work box. Most waxes don’t retain a built up look because the wax
doesn’t have a “plastic” nature to it. It tends to flatten as it is
applied. It also is very brittle, especially if you try to draw a
prong over the stone. As the wax cools and hardens it becomes
brittle and as you try to pry it back from the stone it breaks. I
use a wax called “Tough Guy” or maybe “Tuff Guy” that I was able to
find at Gem and Mineral shows many years ago. I never saw it
advertised and it was home made by the elderly dealer. I haven’t
seen him since so I’m sure it is not available now.

This wax has a high level of plastic-like ingredients in it. If you
try to dig your fingernail into it you struggle to get a piece to
come off. Because of this toughness it flows slowly and you have to
turn the wax pen heat up high to get it to run. It has a very high
level of flexibility when it cools so I just draw the prongs on the
sides of the stone, let it cool and pop the stone out. The prongs do
not break off! This wax does not carve well due to the toughness and
plasticity.

Last year I was running low so I was desperate to find a
replacement. I have found out how to make a close substitute out of
injection wax and hot melt glue. I think it is about 60% wax and 40%
hot melt glue. I lost the scrap of paper that I wrote the last
mixture on.

I also use a home made wax pen with a specially designed tip for the
wax. Unfortunately I can’t draw worth a hoot so I probably won’t do
well making a sketch of the tip.

Bob Rush
A very long time hobbiest lapidary and jewelry maker.


#17

One variable that I haven’t settled on yet is tip shape for wax
welders. As far as I can see surface tension is the main influence,
for example I use a kind of long spoon shape, the wax settles into
the hollow of the curve and yuo then fed it out sideways onto your
model. If you have a sharp point it will ball back fronm the point
and it can be difficult to apply a very small amount with precision.
I have tried a concave tip with a hollow end without much effect. I
keep thinking about the old style Kerr wax tool like an electric
tjanting. sp? If you could cast thin wax wire and feed it into a tiny
funnel with a hot end, build up would be much faster!

Research continues… I do have a living to earn though,
sigh.

Tim.


#18
If I had to do a lot I would extrude some with a glue gun,turn down
the power and use matt extruding wax, weld the bits in place. 

Wow, how cool! Can you really put wax in a glue gun? I want to be
able to make my own wax wires because the ones they sell are never
long enough and I tried attaching two together, but that didn’t work.
Does it have to be a special glue gun or will any old one work? You
said “extruding wax” is that easy to find at suppliers? I’ll have to
look around. Pardon my enthusiasm, but I am new at this and I
appreciate all the great tips I get at Orchid.

Augest Derenthal
Cry Baby Designs


#19
wow, how cool! Can you really put wax in a glue gun?

You need a new glue gun, and only ever use it for this purpose. I
used a light dimmer to cut down the power, I can’t remember the exact
setting, I think it was less that half normal. Extend the nozzle with
a bit of silver or brass tube, this lets it cool down nearer setting
temperature, I used some with an I/D of about 0.9mm, again
experiment, I used about an inch.

The wax will swell a bit when it comes out, keep a diameter
consistent by stretching slightly as you extrude. Use matt red
extruding wax, the diameter is exactly the same as glue sticks. it’s
rather rubbery though if you want to rework it. (Why doesn’t somebody
invent the perfect all purpose wax!)

Adolfo Mattiello’s book ‘Wax Modelling’ has all the details, Rio
Grande stocks it. I just could not afford the Matt Gun at the time, I
am sure it is much better. He is the expert.

On checking my glue gun was an old one, I just think you know what
you are getting if it is clean.

Regards Tim.


#20

Is this the Tuf Guy Green wax you are looking for?
http://www.freemanwax.com/flakes.htm