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True melting temperatures


#1

Hello,

I am seeking for some about TRUE melting temperatures of
metals and their alloys. Im intrested in silver and its alloys. The
problem is that I have seen many diffrent melting temperatures in
many sources. And I am mad about it!

In Tim McCreight book Practical Casting he says:

-Fine silver 961C/1762F
-Sterling silver 920C/1640F
-Coin silver(reticulation silver) 890C/1634F

The first problem is that when I convert *F to *C

-Sterling silver 920C should be 1688F and 1640F should be 893C

So which on is TRUE melting temp?

If it is 920*C then *F temp is wrong. It *F temp is correct that *C
temp is wrong. But if F temp is correct than it means sterling
melts at 893
C and that is totally stupid because it cant have only
3 degree higher melting temp then coin silver!

Other way is that coin silver can have wrong temp here in this book.
Coin sivler is 80/20 and its melting temp is 890C?? Then how it is
possible that eutectic alloy of silver 71,9/28,9 can have melting
temp 780
C???

Ok enough of this. Please, can someone give me RIGHT melting
temperatures of these silver alloys?

Cheers, Mark


#2
If it is 920*C then *F temp is wrong. It *F temp is correct that
*C temp is wrong. But if *F temp is correct than it means sterling
melts at 893*C and that is totally stupid because it cant have
only 3 degree higher melting temp then coin silver 

It’s not stupid, it’s fact.

For oxygen-free pure silver 961.93 C (1763.5 F)
Sterling 893 C (1640 F)
Coin Silver 890 C (1635 F)
Eutectic alloy 780 C (1435 F)

Jim

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#3

Hi Mark:

Use the Fahrenheit temps. Fine silver melts at about 1762 f, and
sterling gets slushy and finally melts completely around 1640 f. No

clue about coin silver. If it’s an American book, assume the author
thinks in Fahrenheit, even

if he’s giving temps in centigrade. There aren’t all that many of us
who actually think in centigrade outside a science lab, even now.
Some of us do both, but don’t convert. (I just remember two sets of
numbers, for those things where it matters to me to be able to use
both systems. Don’t ask me to convert

between them without a computer though.)

Regards,
Brian.