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[Trivia] etymology of the word "champleve"


#1

And now for a trivia question. What it is the etymology of the word
champleve? (hint it does not mean “raised field”, source: M-M
Gauthier)

David in Victoria, British Columbia, happy because the garage, all
brightly painted and lit, is now a little studio.


#2
  And now for a trivia question. What it is the etymology of the
word champleve? (hint it does not mean "raised field", source: M-M
Gauthier) 

Unless there’s a trick somewhere, the etymological sources are the
French noun “champ” (surface), and the verb “lever” (to lift.) It’s
a process of enameling in which the metal “ground” is removed by
etching with acid or engraving. This leaves a design formed with
raised ridges to hold the enamel. It’s pronounced “shomp-leh-vey.”

Rick Martin –


#3

Hello All,

In M-M Gauthier (1972, Les Emaux du Moyen Age Occidental. Fribourg,
Office du Louvre, p 30) one learns that the etymology of the term
describing pit enamelling is false. According to Gauthier, the
correct term is chantlev� meaning raised “edge”. One can create this
edge by gouging the metal on either side of an imaginary line. The
error in terminology might have possibly occurred because in French
the nouns “le champ” (the field) and “le chant” (the edge) are
homonyms. My Harrap’s French-English dictionary translates the noun
"le chant" as “edge, side” . My Hachette states 2. chant n. m. TECH La
partie la plus �troite d’une pi�ce,… I believe that "le chant " is
an old word not much in use nowadays. I apologize to whomever for my
spelling. The diacritics do not seem to get passed on.

David, Happy because he just sold a piece - and now can go and buy
those files he needs :slight_smile: