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Trinkit Kiln cord


#1

I just got my trinket kiln out to use. I have 2 old ones. This cord
is the old type used years ago and although it doesn’t look
especially large it is heavy duty and has worked well for years. It
is still in good shape.

On the black plug that fits into the kiln, the following numbers are
stamped in: 5A.250V-10A.125V. This might help when looking for a
cord. You might find something like this in an old hardware or
electrical store.

One important thing to make sure when using equipment like this is
to make sure the plug prongs that go into the wall socket are free
from oxidation. I live near the ocean and have a problem with
oxidation, every so often I must clean off plugs on my equipment with
sanding sticks or steel wool. Phil Strona of Vcella Kilns told me
about this when I noticed one of my kiln cords heating up. It can be
dangerous situation.

Louise
@lgillin1Dr. E. Hanuman Aspler
Webmaster


support@ganoksin.com

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#2
    One important thing to make sure when using equipment like
this is to make sure the plug prongs that go into the wall socket
are free from oxidation. I live near the ocean and have a problem
with oxidation, every so often I must clean off plugs on my
equipment with sanding sticks or steel wool. Phil Strona of Vcella
Kilns told me about this when I noticed one of my kiln cords
heating up. It can be dangerous situation. 

Another important thing to watch out for with any of the high draw
equipment that we all use, is make sure that the receptacle grips
the plug prongs firmly. Especially when items are left plugged into
the same socket for extensive timespans (common with bench power
tools) the brass contacts loosen up.

Plug in an ordinary lamp. If it feels like the plug goes in with
little resistance, and or the lamp flickers if you wiggle the plug,
it may be time for a new receptacle. The heavy duty replacements
(most residential grade ones are only rated for 10-15 amp), are $1-2
(US) at most, and anyone handy with tools and able to find and turn
off the breaker can replace one (Never use the quick connects,
always use the screw terminals). At worst, the one-time trip charge
for an electrician is way cheaper than fire damage.

(Yes, I’m a trained electrical worker, jewelry is my hobby)

 Ron Charlotte -- Gainesville, FL
 @Ron_Charlotte1 OR afn03234@afn.org