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Titanic stained


#1

Hello all i am doing some titanium pieces, until now they have all
been anodized. I normally finish them with purple scotchbrite and
the color sticks very nicely. I wanted to do some naturally colored
pieces but after cleaning the oxide layer it forms back again quite
quickly. Now if the new oxide layer was uniform I’d be happy with
that. The problem is that it is not uniform and it shows Brown
areas. How can I prevent that? Is there a way to form an oxide layer
that is uniform and doesn’t show color? I have an anodizer if need
be. I also use gloves to prevent fingerprints but the metal gets this
Brown tarnish no matter what I do…

Thanks in advance fellow orchidians,
Simone Cervellati


#2

We advise that if you’ve done a physical oxide removal first or a
chemical one to anodize 5 volts on the surface of the metal to "seal"
that removal. It’s virtually invisible to the naked eye but will
allow you to color at a later date with no problems.

Deborah, Michele & Sharon


#3
i am doing some titanium pieces, until now they have all been
anodized. I normally finish them with purple scotchbrite and the
color sticks very nicely. I wanted to do some naturally colored
pieces but after cleaning the oxide layer it forms back again
quite quickly. Now if the new oxide layer was uniform I'd be happy
with that. The problem is that it is not uniform and it shows Brown
areas. How can I prevent that? 

Your question in line 7 in your post.

the answer is no.

Read my reply earlier re colouring titanium.

What state are the pieces of titanium when you have made them? the
basic dull grey colour? As titanium is a reactive metal, it will form
the thinnest oxide layer at normal room temperatures, just like
aluminium does., If you want to remove this layer, the only wheels
are the 6in dia by 1in wide 1000 grit size in silicon carbide, made
by 3M co You will need to talk to them to ensure you do NOT get the
wheel that uses.

aluminium oxide grit. Then you need a motor and parellel spindled
arbour to run it at 1500 rpm max.

As fo the brown scotch problem, the wheel above is the only material
that will cut titanium oxide off the metal.

I spent many hours at the New Metals division if the Imperial Metal
Industries factory in Birmingham when I was researching this metal
and its uses.

Its a challenging element but will reward you if you can master it.

Ted.