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Thickness and Weight = Value?


#1

How many of you think that the gauge thickness and weight of a piece
contribute significantly to it’s value and retail price? I guess I
would say thickness and weight versus the detail, craftmanship and
precious metal it’s made from…

I’m working on some pieces now that I’ve fabricated from 16 gauge
silver sheet and they feel rather light to me. I’m contemplating
soldering an extra sheet onto them.


#2

This is a question that is determined by the design and function of
the piece.

I often carve my wax patterns for rings at approximately 1.5mm thick
but if I am handmaking a pair of earrings, I want them to be light
enough to be comfortable to wear.

Keep in mind how the piece will be worn as well as how the finished
design will look. If a piece will be subjected to heavy wear and
tear and the design calls for it use a heavier gauge metal.

Good Luck
Greg DeMark
email: greg@demarkjewelry.com
Website: www.demarkjewelry.com
Custom Jewelry - Handmade Jewelry - Antique Jewelry


#3

Hi:

IMHO, I would say that depends on the work, if it is a simple ring,
for example, I say yes but if it is a ring with delicate work I say
no, just my two cents as you say.

Regard’s
Alvaro Diaz Codoceo
Santiago, Chile
Ex Umbra In Solem


#4

How many of you think that the gauge thickness and weight of a piece
contribute significantly to it’s value and retail price? Weight is an
easy indicator of value. It works because it is something the
consumer can test and feel. Other factors can also indicate value,
but generally a professional has to educate the consumer about these
benefits. An example is anticlastic work.

Weight sells itself; handwork, detail and technique often need
salesmanship and marketing. Soldering on a plate will add more labor
cost to the piece and add only a slight amount of intrinsic value.
The added cost in labor isn’t due to the fact that the technique is
difficult or because your making it more durable, it’s because you’re
trying to add artificial value.

I say leave it like it is and when you make another one make it out
of heavier material.

Larry


#5

Continue from:
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/thickness-and-weight-=-value

Hello Sequoia,

     How many of you think that the gauge thickness and weight of a
piece contribute significantly to it's value and retail price?...
I'm working on some pieces now that I've fabricated from 16 gauge
silver sheet and they feel rather light to me. 

Are you making belt buckles?? 16 gauge sterling sheet is plenty
heavy for almost anything and too heavy for many pieces of jewelry,
unless pierced. The weight of a large (>25mm diameter) pin in 16
gauge would pull on most fabric to which it was pinned. The better
question is: will the gauge chosen be substantial enough for the
piece to hold shape and not bend in normal use after work-hardening?
I like 20 or 22 gauge for most sterling jewelry, but will use 26 to
30 gauge for earrings and large pins/pendants to decrease weight.
The thinner gauges usually need to be reinforced with wire or some
metal manipulation like corrugation or folds.

A very nice thing about 16 gauge sheet is that you can run it
through your mill to supply thinner gauges - avoids having to stock
so many different gauges.

Hope your holidays were fulfilling, Judy in Kansas, where the
freezing drizzle is putting a crystal glaze over everything!