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Superglue brand name for jewelry


#1

Hai,

Could you give the superglue brand name & what are the applications
in jewellery?

Please share…
C. K.Anandan


#2

Glue has no place in finished metal jewelry unless you are making
inlaid stone jewelry or glueing a pearl on a peg. And even then the
preferred adhesive is two part epoxy. The 24 hour cure kind. Not the
fast set stuff.

I use superglue to glue two pieces together that need to be
identical for filing.

I buy most any brand of super glue at the grocery store. I keep it
in the refrigerator to make it last longer.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.

Jo Haemer
timothywgreen.com


#3

Contrary to popular belief glue is often used in metal jewelry. Some
craftsman consider it a mortal sin and most are glad there are so
many different glues/industrial adhesives. I use super glue to glue
paper designs on metal for piercing and have used it for attaching
organic materials to jewelry. Different strokes for different folks
as they say…whoever they are…haha!

Chris


#4

The main problem with any form of superglue is that it does not
withstand extreme cold. This is quite aside of the fact that good
metal working skills don’t require the use of superglue except in the
instances that Jo mentions. You know the commercial where the fellow
is hanging from his hard hat that has been attached to a metal I-Beam
in construction? You note that the commercial was shot in summer?
There was a reason for that.

Barbara on a late summer day, hoping this weather holds until April
unlike superglue or at least until I get my stock of wood in for the
winter!


#5

I love living in the tropics. superglue holds for decades here… :slight_smile:

Panama Bay Jewelers


#6

I’ve been using a 5 minute epoxy for attaching organic pieces to
sterling. It stands up to abuse better than superglue, but the
consistency is thicker, which makes the application more
challenging.

Is the viscosity of the 24 hour epoxies similar to their 5 minute
brethren, or are there any which are more fluid when first mixed?
And if so, which might that be?

Linda in central FL


#7

I did some research on epoxies a few years ago to use as a coloured
resin finish. my findings were that 5 minute epoxy did not stand up
well to silver dip, which is something a customer is likely to use.
The 30 minute epoxy was completely resistant. I used the fact that it
got stiffer as it cured to coat vertical surfaces. I believe although
I have never used it that Hyxtal , which is a conservation grade
epoxy takes about 3 days to cure fully and might be worth pursuing.

Tim Blades


#8

I use Colores two part clear enamel epoxy from Rio Grande it takes
12-24 hours to set and is very fluid if you want or not depending on
the viscosity ofthe hardner you use. I do not have any affiliation
with them just a customer.


#9
I've been using a 5 minute epoxy for attaching organic pieces to
sterling. It stands up to abuse better than superglue, but the
consistency is thicker, which makes the application more
challenging. 

Linda, I’m not aware of any epoxies that are anywhere near as thin
as superglues.

Most seem fairly similar, though note that as they sit on a shelf
and get older, they seem to get thicker too. So fresher may be
better. But on a more important note, you should be aware that the
quick setting epoxies generally don’t last as long as the slower
setting ones. Water resistance over time, in particular, is poorer,
and for jewelry, exposed to perspiration and more, this is an issue.
I’d suggest the Epoxy 330 (clear color) or Epoxy 220 (amber color, a
bit stronger) brands. These, sold through jewelry and lapidary
suppliers, are especially formulated for best performance in jewelry
type uses (bonding to stone, metals, and more). They are generally
slow setting, giving you about an hour of good working time when
mixed, and fully setting overnight. But here’s the cool part.

If you’re in a hurry, after it’s applied, put your piece under a
heat lamp. That means an ordinary incandescent light bulb (60 watts
is more than enough), placed very close to the bulb. There, it will
get almost too warm to touch. For organics that might not like that
heat, back off a little as needed. But with that gentle heating,
these epoxies will set up to a softish rubbery state (you can now
handle it, no longer sticky, etc) in 5 to 10 minutes, and in 15,
after cooling down again, are fully cured and set up, though absolute
full strength still takes a bit more time (the five minute types also
don’t generally reach full strength for a number of hours or
overnight). You get the advantages of the stronger, more waterproof
slow setting epoxies, with the ability to give you the fast cure
times of the quick setting types when you need that.


#10

I use super glue to set up complicated soldering jobs; it will take
a certain amount of heat.

I prefer any brand so long as it’s fast setting and cheap (because
I’ll use it one time then the tip will foul and the next time I use
it I’ll have to poke a hold in the side, use it, then throw the rest
away.)

Paf Dvorak


#11

Linda, I’m not aware of any epoxies that are anywhere near as thin as
superglues.

Most seem fairly similar, though note that as they sit on a shelf and
get older, they seem to get thicker too. So fresher may be better.
But on a more important note, you should be aware that the quick
setting epoxies generally don’t last as long as theslower setting
ones. Water resistance over time, in particular, is poorer, and for
jewelry, exposed to perspiration and more, this is anissue.

I’d suggest the Epoxy 330 (clear color) or Epoxy 220 (amber color, a
bit stronger) brands. These, sold through jewelry and lapidary
suppliers, are especially formulated for best performance in jewelry
type uses (bonding to stone, metals, and more). They are generally
slow setting, giving you about an hour of good working time when
mixed, and fully setting overnight. But here’s the cool part.

If you’re in a hurry, after it’s applied, put your piece under a heat
lamp. That means an ordinary incandescent light bulb (60watts is more
than enough), placed very close to the bulb. There, it will get
almost too warm to touch. For organics that might not like that heat,
back off a little as needed. But with that gentle heating, these
epoxies will set up to a softish rubbery state (you cannow handle it,
no longer sticky, etc) in 5 to 10 minutes, and in 15, after cooling
down again, are fully cured and set up, though absolute full strength
still takes a bit more time (the five minute types also don’t
generally reach full strength for a number of hoursor overnight). You
get the advantages of the stronger, more waterproof slow setting
epoxies, with the ability to give you the fast cure times of the
quick setting types when you need that.


#12

Zap is one of the glues out there. It is gap filling and does well.
Now daysI use Loctite. The type is eluding me due to a slow
connection, but price wise it’s the most expensive, like $28 a
bottle. I applied half drilled pearls to a PCB board as an appliqu©
on my sketchbook. They are still hanging on!

Make sure you clean your surfaces well with acetone before applying.

Karen Christians


#13

After you use the glue tap the bottle sharply on your bench top
several times. Then “burp” it by squeezing the bottle slightly to
push some air up through the tip. Wipe any residue off the tip with a
paper towel. Do not cap it. Leave it open. Now it’s ready for the
next use.

I can use a bottle of thin for over 6 month by doing this. Then it
gets too thick to flow.

Sincerely,
Bob Keyes


#14
I use super glue to set up complicated soldering jobs; it will
take a certain amount of heat. 

How do you do this without the glue interfering with your solder
joint? I guess you could put it in an area not exactly in your
joint, but how do you keep it from melting and dripping into your
joint? How long do you have before it melts and the piece falls
apart? Also, what do you do to get the extra off’ thanks! El


#15

I use Loctite in the larger, squeeze bottles, jell, fast and slow
setting, depending on what I’m doing. Bottles last for months, not
like the little tubes with the screw caps!

Angelo Giaimo


#16

The main way I use superglue in the studio is to glue cuts closed so
I don’t get dirt in them or bleed on my workpiece.

Aside from that-- it burns off completely, so it will not interfere
with a solder joint, and by the same token, it can be used to hold
cloissons for enameling.

Noel


#17

This may seem odd, but I actually use CA Glue (super glue) as a
finish for my wood rings. It has been the longest lasting finish I
have found. It usually will last a year before needing refinished and
in some cases I have had customers go two years before needing their
rings refinished. The super glue polishes nicely, is waterproof and
handles the everyday wear and tear (abuse) very well.

The great thing about it is it drys in less than 30 sec, I can build
up multiple layers and have a ring finished in less than 5 minutes.
Ha! A lot of wood pens are finished with the CA glue and you can
watch it being done on youtube.

Jonathan


#18
I use super glue to set up complicated soldering jobs; it will take
a certain amount of heat. 
How do you do this without the glue interfering with your solder
joint? 

As you say, I keep it away from the joint.

I just the other day, did a ring and used super glue to set up the
soldering.

I think the best way to illustrate how I use it is to use photos.

The second picture is after I’ve used the glue.

I soldered on the “top” band first, then glue wasn’t needed for the
other one.

The third picture is after it’s all been soldered and the stones are
ready to be set.




Paf Dvorak


#19

Thanks for the info Paf. And nice ring! Did you put the glue on the
outer edge of the settings to keep the glue from getting in the
joint? Thanks. El


#20

super glue?..super GENIUS!

A.