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Stone identification


#1

Hi All,

I have a pair of earrings. They were my mother’s. They’re yellow
gold plain lever backs with “white” stone drops, possibly baguettes
but could be octagons, 3x6mm. They’re plain and pretty.

I think it’s highly unlikely that they’re diamonds, but who knows?
The stones are very white, almost but not entirely devoid of fire. I
can’t see anything with my loupe that helps me to form an opinion;
there’s something stamped on the wire, but for all I know it says
"Avon". :slight_smile: (Is Avon sold outside the US? If not, for those of you
elsewhere: www.avon.com.)

I know this topic has come up before, but if I want to satisfy my
curiosity, how do I find someone who will look at these and tell me
what they are? What qualifications do I need to ask for? Is there a
directory somewhere online? Normally I’m willing to sleuth it out on
the Web; I’m swamped at the moment.

FWiW, if anyone has any specific recommendations, I’m

Christine in Littleton, Massachusetts


#2

Christine,

in MA, you should have NO trouble finding a gemologist. Any retail
jeweler who is a member of American Gem Society (AGS,) (as well as
many other jewelers,) should be able to test the stones for you.

In addition, most pawnshops will have a small electronic device on
hand which will quickly identify any diamond substitute.

David Barzilay
Lord of the Rings
607 S Hill St Ste 850
Los Angeles, CA 90014-1718
213-488-9157


#3
    I know this topic has come up before, but if I want to satisfy
my curiosity, how do I find someone who will look at these and tell
me what they are? What qualifications do I need to ask for? 

As a G.G. I would suggest that, if you want a reliable
identification, search out a gemologist in your area. Preferably a
jewelry store staff gemologist who has been established for some
time.

As a realist, I know that it is hard to part with a gemologists fee,
especially when the stones in question could be practically
anything. A whole lot of people suffer disappointment when they find
out that their “family heirloom” has synthetic components. Most
folks have no idea that synthetic gemstones have been around since
their great-great-grandparents’ day, and assume that they are a
recent technology.

As an alternative, you could search out a local rock and gem club.
There will almost certainly be individuals there who can identify
your stones. Wouldn’t it be grand if they are D- Flawless diamonds?

James in SoFl