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Stick-on magnifiers


#1

These are little clear half-moon pieces of soft plastic that you
position wet inside safety glasses or welding goggles. Once dry they
stay in place! I have two pair in different strengths that are
getting old and scratched.

I can no longer find a supplier for these wonderful little
inventions. Does anyone know if these are still made and where I can
get more? I am in the U.S.

mbstevens


#2

These are little clear half-moon pieces of soft plastic that you
position wet inside safety glasses or welding goggles.

I’ve see these recently in drug stores in the reading glass section.
I saw some in Seattle in July but I was only visiting so I don’t
know the name of the place.

Donna in VA


#3

These are great. I found them at Longs Drugs when my glasses broke
and I had to cobble together some bifocals to use while waiting for
my glasses to be fixed. Extra bonus is that you can also put them
in your sunglasses so you can work or read outdoors.

Linda


#4
    These are little clear half-moon pieces of soft plastic that
you position wet inside safety glasses or welding goggles. 

You mean Optx? I bought mine at Long’s Drugs. You can also mailorder
them from http://www.neoptx.com/

Janet


#5

Steven,

I just found them at our local hardware store called McGuckins in
Boulder Colorado. I did’nt think it at the time but you could make a
pair of magnifiers from safety glasses. They would be lighter than
visors. Mc Guckins has a web site I believe. I will look to see who
makes them the next time I am over that way.

Regards J Morley


#6
I have two pair in different strengths that are getting old and
scratched. 

Michael,

Because I am fanatical about keeping my eyewear free of scratches, I
never, ever rub lenses with cloth. Not even the lens cloths that
opticians swear by. They may be made of microfiber, but they still
(micro)scratch.

I always rinse the lenses under running water to remove grit, then
rub them with very dilute Dawn dishwashing liquid, using the pads
of my fingertips. Wet lenses, wet fingers, wet(ter) detergent.
Running water to rinse, gently shake off excess (hold glasses by
the bridge, not the stem), then blot off any beads of water with
a lens cloth.

Of course, this is a lot to ask for when you’re busy and your
glasses need frequent cleaning from the stuff flying around in the
workshop. Even my husband, who works in an office, said he couldn’t
be bothered. He’d rather breathe on his glasses and wipe them with
his necktie.

Janet


#7

Last summer I got a pair of plastic safety glasses with the close-up
correction built in at a welding supply shop. The cost was around
$13. They came in several magnifications like the reading glasses at
the drugstore, so you need to know what correction you need. Donna in
VA