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Stark's Chain Book


#1

Just bought the Jean Stark book on Loop-in-Loop Chain Making.
It looks terrific, with multiple projects and wonderful
step-by-step descriptions. Need to order some fine silver wire
and I’m on my way…

Has anyone bought and used this book? Let me know what you
think.

RD


#2

Hi,
I purchased Jean’s book as soon as it was out. I’ve used it to
make several chains, and so far have found the instructions clear
and easy to follow. Jean will be teaching again a Chain Making
workshop at the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna Beach,
FL from Jan. 5 through Jan. 9, l998. Florida Society of
Goldsmiths held their first workshop at the Atlantic Center last
Jan., and it went over very well. For further information
regarding FSG workshops in Jan., call (904) 677-5451 or (904)
427-2527.

Laurie


#3

Hi RD

I also have Jean’s book. She had talked about working on it
several years ago when I was lucky enjoy to have taken a three
day workshop with her. A really great teacher. Her book seems very
logical in it’s layout. I have done quadruples and doubles. I’m
working on a quadruple now in 22Kt. with links of 24gauge on a
1/4" dowel. Labor intensive but beautiful. I can’t wait to do the
thai and the flattened sailors knot. If you, or anyone, has any
questions on this type of chain, I might be able to help. Good
luck.

Linda
Red1Eagle


#4

I got the Jean Stark chainmaking book a few months ago. It is a
GREAT reference book for different loop-in-loop chainmaking
techniques! My only complaint about it so far is that I find some
of the formulas for loop sizes vs wire gauge to produce chains
that are a little too tight, particularly on the multiple
loop-in-loop designs (double side weave, double loop-in-loop,
Thai weave, etc.)

You might want to do some experimenting with the formulas they
give to see if you run into the same problem. If you do, try
reducing the wire diameter by a guage or so for the same loop
size and try again.

By the way, I saw someone at a wedding last weekend with a
QUADRUPLE axis, double loop-in-loop necklace in 22k gold. I would
guess that it was 22 or so inches long. YOW! It was beautiful…
and amazing, when you understand the amount of work that goes
into weaving a chain like that! Someone else at the same wedding
was wearing a “simple” necklace, with approx. 2 1/2" segments of
22k single loop-in-loop chain with alternating rectangular
emerald beads and (maybe) 8mm pearls. It was hard not to stare!

Have fun, it’s a great book!
Alan
aderr@concentric.net


#5

t’s a wonderful book and very clear if you follow it step by
step. The chains are really nice and often can be made with
other size wires to get different effects. They are VERY time
consuming. I learned how to make chains from some of Jean
Stark’s students using the techniques that are in the book.
They’re great fun to make if you have alot of patience. ElegantBee


#6

Hi RD,

Has anyone bought and used this book? Let me know what you
think.

I’ve had the book for several months. The book is done very
well, photos/diagrams are great. It’s nice to see something done
this well. The content is good as far as it goes; but I think for
the money we should’ve gotten twice as many designs.

I’ve made a couple of the designs. I used her patterns, but
developed my own dimensions & techniques. They seem to work
better that way.

If you forget about the price, it’s a good ‘chain’ book, it
belongs in every serious chainmakers library. There aren’t many
chain books available.

Dave


#7
 I'm working on a quadruple now in 22Kt. with links of 24gauge on a
1/4" dowel. Labor intensive but beautiful.

Hi, I’m back from a trip to California and have been going
through tons of email. I’m glad to see you’ve had success with
the chains. I’ve heard great things about Jean Stark’s classes
from other people as well. Just placed an order with Hoover for
the fine silver wire. Can’t wait to get started on some of the
chains. I’ll start with the very basic, I think #3, because I’ve
never done this before.

Are you alloying the 22kt gold wire yourself, or have you found
a source that only includes silver and copper in the alloy?
Also, any good sources for the dowels?


#8

Hi rd

I do alloy my gold to 22 Kt. from 24 Kt.grain. I believe Hoover
& Strong now has a similar 22Kt. alloy and also Marco Polo (in
NYC). It might be really nice to buy exactly the gauge and amount
for a chain and not have to spend the time to alloy and pull the
wire:) 22Kt and Fine Silver links are fused. My dowels are from
the hardware store. Get 3’ lengths and cut them to about 6".
Drill a hole thru at one end to thread the waste end. Anneal
First. Coil wire, cut waste, screw off dowel, cut with solder
scissors, fuse links. Doesn’t that sound easy. Every time I
start a new chain the first number of links are terrible until I
get into the rhythm. Good luck.

Linda
@Red1Eagle


#9

Its always that way the first few links…calgang


#10

I like plastic dowels better… then you don’t have to have dry
wire and just keep going fast… and it slips off easier…calgang
I remember when I couldn’t make the chains fast enough… Plus
everything else she designed …


#11

I like plastic dowels better… then you don’t have to have dry
wire and just keep going fast… and it slips off easier…calgang I
remember when I couldn’t make the chains fast enough… Plus
everything else she designed …

where does one get plastic dowels?

thanks,

geo fox


#12
where does one get plastic dowels?

I have used an assortment of knitting needles.

                      Darryl

#13

plastic dolls are on canal street in NYC or any big plastic
store carries them… All sizes… Wonderful! the wire doesn’t
cling to the plastic and can be slipped off real easy… Hope this
helps…calgang


#14

r.wheat-

The dowels are available from any hardware store, even Bourget
Bros. if you are in the Santa Monica area, try OSH, Home Base,
B+B Hardware, Fisher Lumber, etc. Why are you looking for that
specific gold wire, with only copper and silver in the alloy?
(I haven’t read the Stark book) I like to work with fine silver
because it doesn’t tarnish as readily, but it is very soft…
What kinds of solder do you use with fine silver, or do you just
fuse it? Does hammering it or pulling through a rolling mill
ever really harden it?

I finally gave in and bought an air compressor for the used
bench top sand blaster- I can’t wait to try it out for
texturing. Are there any tips or tricks I should know about?
I’ve already bought the sand, and thought I’d try it outdoors to
lessen the hazard of putting all that dust in the air. I also
bought a small airbrush sprayer to use to put lacquer on some of
my patinated pieces. Dipping or painting has disrupted the
finish too much, so hopeully this will work.

Any comments?


#15

For the sandblaster…I have built a cabinet just for
sandblasting, that I can stick my arms through the sides…the
hose through the back…and an opening to put the item to be
sandblasted through


#16

r.wheat-

The dowels are available from any hardware store, even Bourget
Bros. if you are in the Santa Monica area, try OSH, Home Base,
B+B Hardware, Fisher Lumber, etc. Why are you looking for that
specific gold wire, with only copper and silver in the alloy?
(I haven’t read the Stark book) I like to work with fine silver
because it doesn’t tarnish as readily, but it is very soft…
What kinds of solder do you use with fine silver, or do you just
fuse it? Does hammering it or pulling through a rolling mill
ever really harden it?

I finally gave in and bought an air compressor for the used
bench top sand blaster- I can’t wait to try it out for
texturing. Are there any tips or tricks I should know about?
I’ve already bought the sand, and thought I’d try it outdoors to
lessen the hazard of putting all that dust in the air. I also
bought a small airbrush sprayer to use to put lacquer on some of
my patinated pieces. Dipping or painting has disrupted the
finish too much, so hopeully this will work.

Any comments?


#17

I like to work with fine silver
because it doesn’t tarnish as readily, but it is very soft…
What kinds of solder do you use with fine silver, or do you just
fuse it? Does hammering it or pulling through a rolling mill
ever really harden it?

I’ve used regular silver solders with fine silver. The only
drawback is that they tend to show more on fine silver since it
is so white. Fine does seem to work harden.

I finally gave in and bought an air compressor for the used
bench top sand blaster- I can’t wait to try it out for
texturing. Are there any tips or tricks I should know about?
I’ve already bought the sand, and thought I’d try it outdoors to
lessen the hazard of putting all that dust in the air. I also
bought a small airbrush sprayer to use to put lacquer on some of
my patinated pieces. Dipping or painting has disrupted the
finish too much, so hopeully this will work.

The solvents in lacquer can be very hazardous. Use a vented
spray booth or work outside. In both cases use a respirator that
has filters for organic solvents. Dust masks are not adequate.

Robin Casady
http://www.scruz.net/~rcasady/

Macintosh software for:
Managing URL Bookmarks
LX200 telescope control


#18

Why are you looking for that specific gold wire, with only copper
and silver in the alloy? (I haven’t read the Stark book)

Foxymom, the Stark book recommends using either fine silver or
this specific 22K gold alloy for making chains where the links
are fused rather than soldered. In a new thread I have asked why
the alloy must exclude zinc.

I like to work with fine silver because it doesn’t tarnish as
readily, but it is very soft… What kinds of solder do you
use with fine silver, or do you just fuse it? Does hammering it
or pulling through a rolling mill ever really harden it?

As to fine silver, I have used it in the past for bezel making,
both fusing and soldering. From my limited experience, I guess
that If using solder, the higher the melting temp of the solder
(i.e. hard, medium) the greater the silver content and thus the
better the color match to the fine silver. I suspect the fine
silver does harden when being drawn as the Stark books mentions
annealing the wire. But I’d like more people out there to
respond to this one.


#19

keep your sand dry. Make sure you have a dryer or water trap
between the compressor and the sand blaster. wear a dust mask.
Luck!