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[Source] Bow drill


#1

Does anyone know where I can buy a bow drill? Over the years, I have
searched w/o success. Noticed Giacomo using one in one of his
wonderful videos - and it re-lit the fire.

Thanks.
Jim


#2

Contact long time Orchid supporter Kenneth Singh, maker of the Karat
Rolling Mill. I purchased one from Kenneth last year.

Arjan Enterprises arjaninc at aol dot com

Michael David Sturlin
www.goldcrochet.com
www.michaeldavidsturlin.com
http://michaelsturlinstudio.ganoksin.com/blogs/


#3

See page four of this pdf…

http://tinyurl.com/cke52f

they do mail order, but are located in Australia so postage will be
an issue, but the exchange rate with regards to the US dollar is
very favourable right now…

Cheers, Thomas Janstrom.
Little Gems.
http://tjlittlegems.com


#4

Hi Jim:

I picked one up years ago from Rio. No idea if they’re still
carrying them. The Brits still use them, so I might try one of the
tool dealers in London. (Pike’s is the only one that comes to mind at
the moment.) Failing that, try India. I know they’re still in use
there.

You know you need spade point drill bits for it, right? (And that
they’re a right pain to find…)

Best of luck,
Brian


#5
You know you need spade point drill bits for it, right? (And that
they're a right pain to find...) 

but not so hard to make yourself. Sewing needles work well as drill
stock. Snap off the needle’s eye, sand the two sides of that end to a
tapered flat (shaped like the wood wedge for a ring clamp) with a
sanding disk in a flex shaft, or hand grind it on a bench stone, then
place the two little cutting edges. Takes just a few minutes. In
cutting those edges, but the cutting bevel of both edges on the same
side, rather than opposing as is done with twist drills. In use, only
one edge is cutting, but then the other edge cuts when the drill
revolves back in the other direction on the subsequent stroke with
the bow drill.

It’s kind of fun to explore the technique, if only to say you’ve
done it. Personally, I found no great advantage, and found the bow
drill a little clumsy and awkward, but that’s no doubt just a matter
of practice and what you’re used to. And I’m used to flex shaft
drills…

Peter


#6

cookson have one:

http://tinyurl.com/aqpvx8

and walsh have something called a drill stock, illustrated with a
fairly iffy drawing :wink:

http://www.hswalsh.com/Drill_Stocks_.aspx?i=TD22&c=1001

which is much cheaper. Cooksons are expensive for tools, being
primarily bullion dealers, but both companies are very reputable; I
can vouch for both.

But not, sadly, in the US…


#7

Thanks, all! Turns out that the drill is pretty easy to find in the
UK. What I didn’t realize is that the special bits are apparently
not made any more; so it’s a do-it-yourself project. I’ll put it on
that list. Let’s see. . . it’ll be item #719.

Jim


#8
What I didn't realize is that the special bits are apparently not
made any more; so it's a do-it-yourself project. 

Yes, but it’s quick and easy. If you can do a decent job of
sharpening a graver for stone setting, you can grind a flat drill
bit for your bow drill. Not much more complex, really, than
resharpening a dull twist drill.


#9

The drill bits that work in a bow drill, and are still made, are
pearl drill bits.


#10
The drill bits that work in a bow drill, and are still made, are
pearl drill bits. 

yes, though the commercially made ones only cut in the clockwise
rotation, not both directions. Probably not much difference, though,
since both flutes cut in that clockwise direction, rather than just
one. Still, a little less smooth feeling, at least I thought so when
I tried em. But then, as I’ve said before, I never really fell in
love with a bow drill anyway.

Peter


#11
The drill bits that work in a bow drill, and are still made, are
pearl drill bits. 

Thanks. With help from Roberto, I found a set at Otto Frei. They were
advertised in the close-out section as no longer made. Waiting for
UPS. . .

Jim