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Softening rawhide hammer


#1

I saw rawhide hammer that was very well used and was almost ragged
and worn like leather. Apparently what you should sand the off the
faces and soak it in water to expand the ends and then as it gets
used the faces soften up and are gentler on the metal.

Has anyone done this?


#2

Hi,

I saw rawhide hammer that was very well used and was almost ragged
and worn like leather. Apparently what you should sand the off the
faces and soak it in water to expand the ends and then as it gets
used the faces soften up and are gentler on the metal. 

I always put a new rawhide mallet in a vise, and then use a coarse
file or rasp on the surface to remove the glue surface. I’ve never
wetted the leather–interesting idea…

You might be interested in paper mallets, which Charles Lewton-Brain
has helped re-introduce to the contemporary market. I think Allcraft
has them.

Cynthia Eid
cynthiaeid.com


#3

I’ve always preferred hard rubber or plastic on annealed metal since
they won’t leave marks. Always use hammers that won’t require extra
work during the finishing process.

Jeff Herman
hermansilver.com


#4

Hi all,

I was told by Patti Bullard to soften a rawhide hammer by hammering
concrete outside, like a sidewalk. Haven’t tried it yet.

Robin


#5
I was told by Patti Bullard to soften a rawhide hammer by
hammering concrete outside, like a sidewalk. Haven't tried it yet. 

Well dont, coz it will pick up grit and mark your metal, unless of
course its an effect you want.

A stupid idea. Patti has to be having a joke with you.


#6
I was told by Patti Bullard to soften a rawhide hammer by
hammering concrete outside, like a sidewalk. Haven't tried it yet. 

That would pound bits of sand, grit, and who-knows-what-else into
it, no?

Neil A.


#7

Hi

Apart from the time my dog chewed one none of my rawhide mallets
none have been altered for use.

DON’T LEAVE YOUR MALLET WHERE YOU DOG CAN GET IT!

I don’t do anything to my rawhide hammer except use it. I think I
will take a serious look at the hammers Jeffrey Herman has talked
about.

Technology keeps changing and if not making it easier, it makes
better quality.

Richard


#8
I saw rawhide hammer that was very well used and was almost ragged
and worn like leather. Apparently what you should sand the off the
faces and soak it in water to expand the ends and then as it gets
used the faces soften up and are gentler on the metal. 

I’m lucky to have a wet belt sander. When I was teaching, I had
students that over did it with leather hammers and I would sand them
down. The water (from the sander) always made the surface feel a
little gummy, but it was very shallow and hardened right back. Many
newbies are heavy handed at first. It fun to see how people get to
understand how to use and care for the tools. Especially if they are
buying their own!

Good luck
Steve Ramsdell