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#1

Hi folks, We will be applying for our first show soon. When the
promoter asks for a photo of the tent, do they mean a good shot of
just the tent, or the tent with all the displays in place?

Thanks,
Diana


#2

Diana, The promoter is looking for a shot of your display with your
work in it. Depending on the level of show that you are applying to
they are probably looking for a professional looking display (not
card tables), and a consistent body of work that corresponds to the
slides of work that you are using to apply with. Keep it simple and
make sure your name doesn’t appear anywhere in the photo.

Deb Karash


#3

I am having some more/new pieces of my work photographed for jury
slides. Previously I’ve only had single pieces done. This time I
told the photographer to do some pictures of groupings to show that
my work has a “look” and cohesiveness. When a show calls for 4
slides, would it be permissable to have one or two of these slides
be of a grouping? Annette


#4
When a show calls for 4 slides, would it be permissable to have
one or two of these slides be of a grouping? 

Hi Annette. I think it depends on the shows you’re applying to. If
they’re high end, juried craft shows (like ACC, Philadelphia,
Smithsonian), I wouldn’t advise it even if the show prospectus
doesn’t expressly forbid it (and some do). The main reasons are 1) a
grouping of pieces on one slide won’t easily register in the 10
seconds that a jury has to view your 4 or 5 slides; 2) it can be
distracting; 3) the individual pieces in the grouping will be too
relatively small to be comprehensible; 4) it isn’t accepted practice.
The main exception is if the grouping is of a set (necklace and
matching earrings, for instance). If it’s not a juried show but one
where the promoter makes the decisions, then it’s less critical; but
as a general rule, each slide should contain a single piece which is
maximized in the frame (no dead space around the image). Your four
or five slides projected simultaneously on a screen should be
sufficient to show cohesiveness of design – your “voice.”

Beth