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Secure polishing technique


#1

Regarding the problem of jewelry flying out of your hand
when using a polishing machine, the easiest and safest method
that I know of is to run a strong shoelace or leather thong
through the jewelry, and wear either a leather finger cot,
available at most any supply house for less than a dollar, or
an old pair of leather gloves, the sort that are sold in
hardware stores with a leather palm and a canvas top. This
method is for anything that you can run the shoelace through
such as rings.

For flat pieces, if they are large enough, I simply grip
them very securely, and with all pieces keep the jewelry
below the half way point on the diameter of the buff. For
small pieces which are difficult to hold onto, use the
smallest diameter buff that you can find. In some cases
gripping the jewelry with a ring holding device works, but
you must be sure that the wedge is clamped very tight. I
usually whack the end of it with a mallet to lock it
securely.

When polishing chain, the easiest for me is to wrap the
chain around a wooden mandrel, such as a cutoff broomstick,
but be sure that you do not let either end of the chain
loose. A buff will eat chain faster than you can blink.

Hope these ideas prove useful. I have used them successfully
for nearly 30 years. Enjoy. Karl <@Karl>
aka Xanadu Creations - Goldsmith - Silversmith - Enamelist


#2

Karl wrote:

    Regarding the problem of jewelry flying out of your hand
    when using a polishing machine, the easiest and safest
    method that I know of is to run a strong shoelace or leather
    thong through the jewelry, and wear either a leather finger
    cot, available at most any supply house for less than a
    dollar, or an old pair of leather gloves, the sort that are
    sold in hardware stores with a leather palm and a canvas
    top.  This method is for anything that you can run the
    shoelace through such as rings.

Karl:

I do not mean to be overly cautious, but isn’t wearing gloves while
buffing considered a safety no-no, not to mention the risk of winding
the shoelace around the spindle and anything else that gets tangled in
with it.

I use only finger cots, rubber, leather or both.

Mangled jewelry can be repaired or whatever, mangled hands and fingers
are another story.

Once I got the cord of a large pair of headphones I was wearing
tangled on the arbor of the buffer I was using. I very quickly got
R-E-S-P-E-C-T for the buffing machine. Scared the you know what out of
me. Fortunately I didn’t get wrapped up in it too. There is a lot of
torque with a 1/2" shaft powered by 1/2 hp winding cord or you hand on
it. Be careful and think!

Kenneth Gastineau
@Kenneth_Gastineau1


#3
   Once I got the cord of a large pair of headphones I was
   wearing tangled on the arbor of the buffer I was using. I
   very quickly got R-E-S-P-E-C-T for the buffing machine.
   Scared the you know what out of me. Fortunately I didn't get
   wrapped up in it too. There is a lot of torque with a 1/2"
   shaft powered by 1/2 hp winding cord or you hand on it. Be
   careful and think!

AMEN!!! fingercots only - pull you hair back- if it is long,
go gently and slowly. You can replace a piece but not your
fingers.

Joan


#4

UFO’s can happen to anyone but here is a hint for small flattish
objects. I hold them on a short section of lath strip. It’s easy
to turn them over to get the other side but while they are in
secure contact with the wood, the buff can not get underneath the
metal. This method also helps when the metal getstoo hot. On the
bright side, it’s one way to make yourself sweep the floor.

Marilyn