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Scanners


#1

Only thing thats a little difficult is that laying the piece down with the
lid open is that your work will be scanned against black and if
you have large reflective surfaces they will be lighted a little
strangely. You can put a piece of white paper behind the work
(over it actually) and support it evenly on four sides and
you’'ll get the piece with a white background with a little bit
odd shadows. <<

You might also try placing a piece of cloth over the item being
scanned. I’ve not done this, but with different colors, patterns
& different fabrics there’s no telling what might happen. Sounds
like a fun experiment, I may have to get a scanner!

Dave


#2

What kind of scanners work well for jewelry?


#3

I have a flat bed, Scan Ace III it is a mid-priced unit under
$1000 and can scan a 8.5 X 1" page at over 4000 DPI. That is what
you really need to look for is the Dots Per Inch! It is so super,
that the computer guru who keeps my stuff working is astounded by
it. I also have a Epson Stylus Color 600 which prints glossy film
@1440 DPI and costs under $300. Between the two, I can scan
jewelry, glass as long as it isn’t too three dimensional or
anything. I am trying to attach a file here, check it out. It is a
whole 8.5X11" page of fused glass brooches and earrings.

I tried to attach a file, but the file is in BMP. This would take
way to long to send. If I change it to a Jpeg, would it take less
time? Anybody tell me how to send my pictures through E-Mail. I
would appreciate it. Thanks, Pat


#4

I use a Mustek TwainScan Duo flatbed scanner and direct scan my
jewelry. It works pretty well, came with iPhoto Plus, a picture
editing program simialar to PaintShop Pro. Most of the jewelry on
my web page http://www.designjewel.com is done this way -
although the image on my home page and some of the other 'better’
pictures are from professional slides.

Jan - from South-eastern Oregon, USA, and it did snow here this
morning don’t know what happened to Spring.


#5

Dear Alan Revere, I use a Hewlett Packard ScanJet 5P. It’s cheap
and cheerful. Does a great job for a little scanner at the popular
end of the home market. Hope this helps, Rex from Oz.


#6
   What kind of scanners work well for jewelry?

I use a flatbed scanner, Mine is an ancient UMAX that has given
several years of good service. Scan with the top open and you will
get a black background. Then you can change the background easily
using Photoshop.I think the software is as important as the
scanner. Mine came bundeled with Photoshop LE. I upgrades to full
photoshop and use it to tweek the image.

Has anyone tried using a color copier? I’ve used a b&w copier for
jewelry with good results, but never a color copier.

Even barbarians like chocolate chip cookies

Bobert
Carmel,CA


#7

What kind of scanners work well for jewelry?

Any flat bed color scanner with decent resolution . . . ours is
the Optic Pro 9630P Cost is very reasonable . . . around $200.00

Have fun!


#8

Hi,

We are using HP Scan Jet 4c (Flat bed) with an IBM Comapatible
Computer. We are getting satisfactory results. A new model is
available in the market (I don’t know exactly of same HP series )

This scanner is easily compatible with Apple Macintosh Computers
and I have seen jewellery designing software using the same
scanner.

There are many options to adjust colour Contrast and Brightness.
They completely depends upon your requirements.

You can contact me for further assistance.

Shahzad


#9

Hello Pat: If you have a program that allows you to change BMP
images(About 900K each) to JPG images(About 500K) or even GIF
images(About 250K)you can send them on email. On my email I send
GIF or JPG and it appears on the email. BMP must be saved and
veiwed. I have a program called “Microsoft Imager” that allows me
to save files in the different types.

Now for the bad news. If I am not mistaken ORCHID does not allow
sending files or pictures on the list because it really slows
things down. If you have a web page you could put the pictures on
it and give us all the address. Let me know if you need help
setting up a FREE web page

Michael Mathews Victoria,Texas USA


#10
I tried to attach a file, but the file is in BMP.  This would take
way to long to send.  If I change it to a Jpeg, would it take less
time?  Anybody tell me how to send my pictures through E-Mail.  I
would appreciate it. Thanks, Pat

I have a UMAX flatbed with Adobe Photo software. I scanned some
of my work, saved it to .tif and attached it to email. Sent it to
myself to see how fast and how well it came across. It was quick
and the size was unbelievably small in tif compared to the original
scan. I’m having problems getting the silver to look like silver
though. Sometimes its green others its red. Does anyone have any
suggestions to solve this problem? Thanks,

Nancy
ICQ # 9472643
Bacliff, Texas Gulf Coast USA


#11

Hi Alan,

I use a scanner (UMAX S-6E color) for recording designs and then
compiling a catalog that we send our best customers. I say best
customers because the catalog is quite a commitment of time. All
our printing is in house as color xerox’s are about .85 each in
bulk. I have a zip drive and use discs to store everything on.
Photo Shop is my preference for arranging pages but Page Maker
works too.

Two important facts: I find scanning designs that are either soley
sterling or gold without stone for color is more difficult. If your
designs have no stones you might want to find someone who will let
you try theirs first to see how it works for you before you invest
in the equipment. Also, we built a box out of foam core to use as a
cover instead of the lid that scanners have because the light that
escapes with the lid cuts down on the clarity of the image.

If I can help you in any other way let me know. Good Luck, Susan
M. Goodwin


#12

I’m using a Umax Astra 600s scanner [@$250 cdn.] with 4800 dpi
resolution capability but am scanning in the 300 - 400 dpi range.
The problem I encountered with direct scanning is really nice :slight_smile:
red hot spots on high polish areas of the piece. These can be
corrected with a lot of time in the software [Corel Photo-Paint]
but found that photographic dulling spray helps to cut down the
light flare. Dulling spray is [I think] a water soluble oil which
makes a mess of the glass so I ‘fun tack’ the work to a piece of
wood and suspend it on a makeshift bridge over the scanner glass
and cover the whole thing with white paper [same colour as scanner
cover]. This seems to work fairly well to stop flare but on larger
high polish surfaces one loses the ‘metal’ look and gives a dull
flat colour. Does anyone know of another way to stop the flare and
still keep the metal look?

Thanks - Lorne
on Vancouver Island - east of Japan, west of Vancouver


#13
  Now for the bad news. If I am not mistaken ORCHID does not
allow     sending files or pictures on the list because it
really slows things down.

Ah, but if you choose to send the picture (file) to an individual
via E-mail, it should go through without a problem. AOL limits the
size, but many of the other internet providers do not!


#14
  Does anyone know of another way to stop the flare and still
keep the metal look?

Charles Lewton- Brain recommend antipserspirant that is in powder
form. Haven’t tried it yet, but don’t see any reason why that
wouldn’t work. If in chillier situations, a breath of air to fog
the piece may work too.

(Charles, if I misspelled your name, please forgive!)