Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Safely removing polishing compound


#1

I have a great ability to break most things. So when I read about
boiling pieces, to clean off compound before moving onto the next
compound, or soaking in stain remover liquids, etc, I had visions of
stones cracking, blanching, or some other awful thing and thought
that I would ask first! So, how do I clean a piece between polishing
compounds? Also, is it simply left over compound that I’m seeing in
bright sunlight on a polished piece, as almost a shadow? (darn hard
to remove - acts like a stain and vigorous rubbing with a polishing
cloth doesn’t make a fig of a difference).

Many, many thanks in advance!
Ros


#2

Hello Ros,

I’ve been using Dr. Bronner’s Peppermint Pure Castile Soap for 15
years. Bronner’s will also make your shop smell nice. Put about a
quarter cup in a warm to hot crock and use with a Tampico brush

(this brush will not scratch when wet:
http://contenti.com/products/brushes/130-250.html)

I have brushes that I’ve trimmed and shortened the bristles for
various uses when cleaning holloware, flatware, and jewelry. If you
need something stiffer, try a horsehair brush. Nylon brushes such as
toothbrushes will scratch. Feel free to send me an e-mail with any
questions.

Have a happy, healthy new year,

Jeff Herman
http://www.hermansilver.com


#3

The secret is to complete all finishing and polishing operations
before you set your stones.

The shadow you see is probably fire-stain.


#4

Ros,

Ultra sonic with dish soap (maybe a touch of ammonia) or a purchased
cleaning solution. Steam if you have one. Boiling or near boiling in
the same type solutions works too.

Use great care and brief times with organics, soft, delicate stones
especially if you even suspect dyeing or other treatments. Soft tooth
brush gently with above mentioned solutions with care. Hard and fast
rules for sure and you can often break them at the risk of a really
bad$$ day.

That “shadow” you are seeing sure sounds like fire stain if on
sterling silver. It can be avoided with care or alloy choice. Look
at archives for Pripp’s flux and/or Argentium.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#5

I like that idea of using a nice soap, Jeff H - thanks! Will look at
the link and look for the soap.

Cheers,
Ros


#6
The secret is to complete all finishing and polishing operations
before you set your stones. 

Very good point, Tony, and i am now trying to do that, but do find
that sometimes after setting,

a bit of a buff is nice? Or a heavily worn piece?

Ultra sonic with dish soap (maybe a touch of ammonia) or a
purchased cleaning solution. Steam if you have one. Boiling or
near boiling in the same type solutions works too. 

My one and only brief encounter with an ultrasonic cleaner caused the
most beautiful, iridescent colours on some sterling earrings. I
returned the cleaner after that. No idea what happened, may have been
the well water at my parents’ place (they have had trouble with
sulphur too). I’ve been hesitant since. I think that I read
something about not using steam on Argentium, will look that up
again. Maybe an off boil then. re. firescale - I’m using Argentium
silver only, so it must be the compound.

Cheers,
Ros


#7

I like Oakite or BCR (Buffing compound remover - same thing) as
cleaner in the ultrasonic. Put one inch in the bottom and fill with
water in a gallon and a half tank. This stuff blows polishing
compound off and it doesn’t take long. I only need to swish the
silver in there a few times to make sure it doesn’t dull it…no
need to hang it in there for a minute.