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Safe Enamel Disposal


#1

Hello,

I am wondering about the safest way to dispose of enamel. When I
rinse and clean my enamels the water that contains the grains of
enamel - is it safe to flush down the sink?

Thanks
Vicky


#2

Vicky,

I wouldn’t flush it down the sink. Dry it out and either use it as
counter enamel, or toss it in the trash. Or you can even use it as an
alternative to pumice for cleaning metal.

Pam East
www.pameast.net


#3

Hi Vicky

I line a strainer with paper towel and drain the water through that,
then dispose of the papertowel into the garbage. It should NOT go
down the drain as it is silica with metal oxides, etc. and is like
putting sand down the drain. Though a small amount may do no harm, a
bunch or continual amount can build up and plug the drain. This then
causes the need for a drain guy to roto root the pipes, at your
cost, and according to Murphy’s Law this will happen during off hours
and cost you even more.

Karen Bahr
Karen’s Artworx


#4

As enamel is basically powdered glass and as glass is basically
silica - the same as quartz - the most abundant mineral on the earth,
I would think it wouldn’t be a problem - BUT PLEASE NOTE THIS IS ONLY
MY INITIAL THOUGHTS AND NOT CONCLUSIVE. Hopefully someone else knows
the proper answer. But even if you can’t pour them down the sink, I’m
pretty sure you could put them on your garden without doing any harm.
But obviously the correct recommendations should be followed.

Helen
UK


#5

I am wondering about the safest way to dispose of enamel. When I
rinse and clean my enamels the water that contains the grains of
enamel - is it safe to flush down the sink?

I usually let these dry out and add them to my counter-enamel mix.

BBR - Sandi Graves
Stormcloud Trading Co (Beadstorm)
Saint Paul, Minnesota
651-645-0343


#6

In regard to putting enamels in the garden, I would suggest against
it as both an enamelist and an avid gardener. many of the coloring
agents in enamels are very toxic if broken down, for instance by
acid rain. Some enamels still contain a certain amount of lead. Other
toxins are cobalt, cadmium, and others.

Peace,
Richard


#7
I would suggest against it as both an enamelist and an avid
gardener. many of the coloring agents in enamels are very toxic if
broken down, for instance by acid rain. 

What you say may have merit but I’d have to look into it further.
Generally, glasses aren’t attacked by acids - hence nasty acids
being kept in glass bottles. But yes my initial thought of it being
okay (which I said may well be wrong) was probably a case of me
opening my mouth too soon and jumping in with both feet. Folks are
most likely used to me doing that on a regular basis! :wink:

Probably the most sensible solution has been mentioned already by an
enamelist - use it for counter enameling.

Helen
UK