Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Rose gold care instructions


#1

I am like many others working more and more often in Rose Gold. I
tend to be working mostly in 14kt, never 10kt and rarely 18kt.

I remember from many years ago when also there was a demand for red
gold, that we would occasionally have a customer that was having a
problem wearing it. Recently I had a customer complain that a Rose
Gold moveable part on the top of her ring (essentially it was a jump
ring that was free to move through a hole in a part on the top of the
ring) was causing her a problem. It left a dark mark on her finger. I
can see a few reasons for this to happen.

However it prompted me to write to the collective knowledge here and
ask… Are there any issues with red gold alloys causing stains on
the wearers skin? Are there issues with red gold alloys tarnishing
much more easily? Have you found that some people cannot wear red
gold alloys? Any other issues that you could share? (Any problems
with the posts on earrings?) Do you give specific care instructions to
purchasers of red gold jewellery?

Many thanks.
Franklin


#2
Are there any issues with red gold alloys causing stains on the
wearers skin? Are there issues with red gold alloys tarnishing much
more easily? 

Yes, if you use the old alloys. I use United Refining Red Gold alloy
540 and don’t have too many problems. This is a de-ox casting alloy
and it is just as easy to use as 14K Yellow. I have had customes with
problems and sensitivity, but only a few and you seem to get some of
that with any material.

I have a theory about red-pink-rose gold and how it has been used or
avoided in the past 100 years or so. Let me know if this sounds
plausible, especially those of you with an interest in the history of
techniques and manufacturing trends.

Late 19th century and early 20th century you see a lot of rose gold.
Usually fabricated or stamped pieces. Even used as a color of
gold-filled or rolled gold. But then most gold jewelry was made using
those same techniques. As more jewelry was cast in the mid-20th
century you see less rose gold. My experience is that the older
alloys make 'dirty" castings. Lots of oxides and related problems.
You can make it work, but there is a greater potential for inferior
quality. Then, with the new de-ox alloys that started catching on in
the 1990s, the problem goes away. So now that casting rose gold is
more viable, more jewelers are using it and it has made a comeback.

Stephen Walker