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Rock's Little Honey tool info


#1

I lucked into a collection of lapidary equipment recently, including
a Ultra-Tec V2 faceting maching, which I was able to contact Ultra-
Tec for info about.

Also in the collection, was a small portable cabbing unit in a
woodgrain carry case. The info sheet on the lid and the logo on the
machine identify it as “Rock’s Little Honey”. If anyone knows of a
source for documentation or other info on the machine, I’d be
grateful.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL


#2

I lucked into a collection of lapidary equipment recently, including
a Ultra-Tec V2 faceting maching, which I was able to contact Ultra-
Tec for info about.

Also in the collection, was a small portable cabbing unit in a
woodgrain carry case. The info sheet on the lid and the logo on the
machine identify it as “Rock’s Little Honey”. If anyone knows of a
source for documentation or other info on the machine, I’d be
grateful.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL


#3

Ron…I noticed your previous query on this item some time ago and
did some research but cannot find any info on the machine. Do you
have a pic of it?

Cheers, Don in SOFL.


#4
Ron...I noticed your previous query on this item some time ago and
did some research but cannot find any info on the machine. Do you
have a pic of it? 

Follow this link to a set of photos:
http://bellsouthpwp.net/r/o/ronch2/_sgg/f10000.htm

Jim Small has since given me a clue that it was acquired by Maxant
Industries in Mass, and I’m waiting to see what they have to say.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL


#5

Ron…from what I see in the pic…this is a buffing lathe for
metal…not for cutting cabochons. I see there is a lot of metal
polishing materials in the kit. There is also some stone working
items such as the expanding drum, saw blade (?), a grinding wheel
(diamond), and maybe a polishing end plate.

The reason I say its a metal polishing unit, is the open motor. When
cutting/polishing gemstones you nmust use copious water. It is
dangerous to do so around a motor that has open cooling vents.

Cheers, Don.


#6

Posting with a tad of trepidation here, as I am quite the beginner,
and only tapped in, trying to find info on post I had seen, on unit
called, Rock’s Little Honey. Just aquired one also, looking for info
and to share info on suppliers I have found. Inherited a few buckets
of slabbed Stone Canyon Jasper, trying to teach myself something new,
got the Honey unit as a function of all this. Timid voice in the
background here, any info welcome!

Jean
Richton, MS


#7

Jean I had a person that came into my store selling and old covington
cab machine with a bucket of rocks. It is very easy to learn how to
cut stones. I will be purchasing a Diamond Cab unit soon. This will
do a great job but will save time. I will be putting my designs on a
web site soon. Cutting is Theraputic.

Eric


#8
Posting with a tad of trepidation here, as I am quite the
beginner, and only tapped in, trying to find info on post I had
seen, on unit called, Rock's Little Honey. Just aquired one also,
looking for info and to share info on suppliers I have found.
Inherited a few buckets of slabbed Stone Canyon Jasper, trying to
teach myself something new, got the Honey unit as a function of all
this. Timid voice in the background here, any info welcome! 

The Little Honey is still being made by Maxant Industries, PO Box
454, Ayer, MA 01432. Phone number is 978-772-0756. They have a
website
with limited at www.maxantindustries.com.

They haven’t changed the design. The only differences I can spot are
the different logo on the case and shroud and the location of the
power switch. All of the parts in the catalog they sent me look like
they should fit just fine. Pretty much everything on the machine is
industry standard, in any case, so replacement parts don’t look to be
an issue. It’s a nice, portable addition to the old Star Diamond
behemoth that I taught myself on.

For pretty decent beginner self-teaching for lapidary, I can
recommend Introduction to Lapidary by Pansy Kraus

http://www.ganoksin.com/jewelry-books/us/product/0801972663.htm

I buy my rough at the occasional rock and gem show, and from Kingsley
North (whose prices are decent enough that I feel free to experiment
with the less expensive lower grade rough that they sell cheap).

I did a lot of my initial practice on some dark green boulder jade
that I got a pile of for very cheap. It’s a tough, fairly forgiving
material to learn on. I’m still getting there. My pieces are
presentable, but nowhere near pro quality, yet.

Ron Charlotte – Gainesville, FL