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Ring Sizing


#1

“Hi” Everybody

I think everybody has covered all there is about sizing rings
but would like to describe a way of holding the insert of gold or
what ever metal.

When the shank has been cut file a < > in each end of the shank
across it’s width, shape the new piece of shank to the new ring
size and with the ring at the size on the sizing stick mark the
length on the shank insert at the points of the v’s, cut and file
end to fit ring shank, solder and finish. End pressure of ring
shank keeps everthing in place.

This was shown to me by a top jeweller here in N.Z… Now I dont
have to worry about the new piece jumpimg out or trying to wire
it in place.

Hope it is of some help to somebody.

Best wishers to all.

Major. @pyramid


#2

G’day; I have never had a ring mandrel which is marked with sizings.
But I do have a hardened steel plain one. I simply place the
appropriate sizing ring on it as far as it will go, then mark around
each edge of it with a fine marker pen (spirit type). If I am away
from home, I get the potential customer to wrap and twist a piece of
soft wire to a comfortable fit around their finger and mark that on
the mandrel. Having removed the sizer, I make the ring to fit
exactly between the marks. Thus the finished rings fit properly on the
customer’s finger.

I also made a tapered wooden mandrel of hard wood. Having sanded and
polished the inside of the ring, I use the wood to hold the ring by
jamming it on the taper for sanding and/or buffing the outside. I can
also use this wooden taper to hold the ring whilst setting. – Cheers
now, John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#3

Several years ago I worked with a designer who made many rings with
slanted shanks. The sort that follows the webbing of the finger. After
months of frustration trying to figure out how to explain to our sales
people how to “guess” the proper size we decided to make our own slant
shank sizers.An initial slant shank model was made thatwas of an
average width of the pieces we made. It also had a nice comfort
fit,something that is not considered by the people who manufacture
sizers. This piece was cast and molded and the resulting waxes were
sized to all the sizes we felt were necessary. These waxes were once
again cast in silver, finished out,labeled with the size andhung by
jump rings from a chain.For the most part this solved the problem,
took very little time and it was a great exercise for our latest
apprentice. When doing work for my clients who are in the business
but not at my location I simply ignore the size( no matter what sort
of shank it has) and have them measure the inside diameter of whatever
sizing device they may be using. This measurement is transferred to my
mandrel and the piece sized accordingly. John Sholl Littleton, Co