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Ring sizing tips


#1
Although your post was about the 'test', I just have to know how I can
size 20 rings an hour.  Up and down.  I'm a retail jeweler who spends the
majority of the day at the bench.  Your outline of tips would be really
appreciated.

I’ll try… although speed tends so come by itself with experience. After
spending several years in the repair end, and sizing 10s of thousands of
rings, it starts coming naturally…

tip one)

Have a variety of gold stock available so you almost never have to roll
stock, and have a bench mounted ring bender very close by so you can swivel
around and bend the stock to shape quickly.

tip two)

it’s can be much quicker to roll stock to closely match shank thickness
(when going up several sizes) than to file it to shape. (size ups is where
we lose the most time)

tip three)

Many years ago I invented a little instrument that marks exactly one size
on a shank. The owner of a shop I worked at (some years later) asked me if
he could manufacture it, and I agreed. A couple of years ago I saw this
device in the Gesswein catalog, as well as a write-up in a jewelry mag
noting that it was produced by Sasha’s Jewelry (my ex-employer!) The tip
is, get one of these from Gesswein, it’s a major time saver for marking the
amount to be cut out on size downs, and even for marking stock for size ups
(although I always just used the cut edges of the ring shank to mark the
bent-to-size metal). You can easily make your own. by soldering two pieces
of square steel (1/8" square stock) to a center piece that is exactly 2.5
mm in cross section, (kind of like a fork…) Then file or grind bevels on
the tips to produce sharp edges (45 degree angle or so). It will work
forever…

tip four)

Use an ultra thin (.1mm) carborundum slitting disk to cut delicate rings
(or all rings…). It’ll cut the shank in about 1 second without bending
it.

tip five)

use paper towel and water to quickly protect sensitive stones. there’s no
clean up afterwards as with Kool Jewel etc…

tip six)

use gold instead of solder to size new rings (weld or fuse). Cut thin wire
into small lengths and use it just like solder. With bright cast golds, it
warks almost as well as solder, and you can seriously abuse the joint
without worrying about cracking. (I fuse every opportunity).

I will continue this as I find time

Hope it helps

   Jeffrey Everett, jewelry craftsman

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Jewelry design, cad/cam, milling, scroll, filigree, & more.
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#2

use paper towel and water to quickly protect sensitive stones. there’s no
clean up afterwards as with Kool Jewel etc…

Hi Jeffrey, Just a tip to this one: I use an old china cup filled
with very fine sand. I pour water into it until it just stands
on the surface. You can put several rings with the setting
buried in the wet sand and solder them all. Generally, I do the
same operation on all the rings in a batch, that is, I take all
rings to be sized down, mark them all, saw them all, bend the
shanks, solder. You need to take up a tool only once for all
rings, not each time for every single ring. This saves a lot of
time. I’ll never reach that 20 per hour output, however. Regards,
Markus


#3

<< I’ll never reach that 20 per hour output >>

I mentioned at my shop that Jeffery had said he was able to size
up to 20 rings an hour (which I don’t doubt). They were horrified
thinking that I was going to expect that kind of production from
them. They all felt that if everything went perfectly (no cracks
to repair, no stones to remove or tighten, no stock to roll out,
no fitting of two rings together, etc) they MIGHT be able to do
it. They felt they could not sustain it for hours, that they
couldn’t do 60 in 3 hours. One guy said that is seems like he
spends more time doing the extra stuff (tightening etc) than
doing what it actually came in for. I am happy if they do 30 jobs
a day, 40 is usually the high water mark unless they have really
simple jobs (20 a day is average). Its fun to hear how others
work. I always try to mix up everyones daily workload with a
variety of work, although its less efficient its makes happier
goldsmiths who are more interested in their work.

Mark P.


#4
They all felt that if everything went perfectly (no cracks
to repair, no stones to remove or tighten, no stock to roll out,
no fitting of two rings together, etc) they MIGHT be able to do
it. 

exactly… I should have qualified my statement…

They felt they could not sustain it for hours, that they
couldn't do 60 in 3 hours. One guy said that is seems like he
spends more time doing the extra stuff (tightening etc) than
doing what it actually came in for.

Especially the size jobs from some of the chain and discount
stores, ick…

I am happy if they do 30 jobs
a day, 40 is usually the high water mark unless they have really
simple jobs (20 a day is average). Its fun to hear how others
work. I always try to mix up everyones daily workload with a
variety of work, although its less efficient its makes happier
goldsmiths who are more interested in their work.

To be absolutely truthful, I was happy averaging 12 per hour,
that’s about the slowest I worked expect for the occassional
nightmare job. But I got out of the sizing game many years ago,
thank heavens… (although I made more money sizing for stores, I
grew REAL tired of it).

Jeffrey Everett