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Removing Tarnish


#1

Of all the products for tarnish removal on silver, what is the best
one you know of that can be purchased commercially. I need something
for our jewelry in our cases that is easy to use and to clean up.

Any thoughts?

-k
Karen Christians
http://www.metalwerx.com/
Accredited Jewelry Instruction


#2

Attn. Karen, Greetings; Might try this: Line a plastic bucket with tin
foil. Stir Baking Soda into HOT distilled water, add to bucket…Dip
and enjoy. Take care-- Dave (18k)


#3

Hello Karen: I have found that the tarnish remover sold by Swest Inc.
is the best. It takes only seconds. It is purple and smells like
rotten eggs (Sulfur smell). I use it to remove the pinkish tint on
gold caused by perfumes and chlorine also.
http://www.swestinc.com/jeweler.html

Michael R. Mathews Sr. Victoria,Texas USA


#4

Karen I don’t know about purchased commercially but have you tried the
washing soda and aluminium trick? Dissolve washing soda in warm water,
drop some aluminium foil in and then drop in your silver - lots of
bubbles and clean silver. I ahve done this in front of customers on
their own pieces (call it magic formula!) and they lokk at me as if I
am an alchemist bit leave with a big smile on their face!

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
@Andy_Parker
www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023


#5

I’ve had good luck with Tarn-X, but you can’t use it on soft stones,
like turquoise, opal, etc. For these, I use a Sunshine cloth, sold by
Rio. These last until you can’t stand to pick them up because they’re
so grundgey looking you’re afraid you’ll catch something. Most
important is to prevent tarnish in the first place. I use Renaissance
wax or a very dilute solution of high grade (cabinet grade) lacquer.
I’ve not had a problem with either product yellowing or obscuring
patina colors, and tarnish is no longer a problem.


#6

Karen, I was showing a couple of friends the aluminum plate with
baking soda in hot water method and was wearing a very tarnished
silver ring. I was cleaning a large sterling platter using a foil
turkey pan first and then my stainless steel sink. What came out the
cleanest and most rapidly was the ring I was wearing, shiny as new.

Second idea although it works too well where there is intentional
darkening is the Ionic system “Speed Brite”, it took too much
blackening from an Indian Ring I allowed to be demonstrated on.

Good luck,
Teresa


#7

Just an additional note to the aluminium foil and washing soda method
of cleaning silver.

This is an electrolytic process and the silver being cleaned has to
be in contact with the aluminium. It works well with silver plated
items as well.

Don’t substitute your favourite aluminium cook pot with a washing
soda solution in it. It will work well but you will end up with holes
in the pan. The aluminium is eaten away by the process.

Tony Konrath
Gold and Stone
www.goldandstone.com
tony@goldandstone.com


#8

Ok, I’ve read so many replies saying that the soda/aluminium
foil/warm water trick works like magic, that I have to say that when I
tried it, on old silver-plated flatware, it didn’t work.

What did I do wrong? Not enough soda?

I’ve also seen some reference to using “washing soda.” I’ve got a box
of this, in addition to regular ole “baking soda” (sodium
bicarbonate), does either work as well as the other?

So, what are the proportions? One cup of soda to a gallon of water?

Karen, for jewelry in the case, I’d say a “sunshine cloth” would be
most convenient, least messy. And waxing the jewelry to prevent
tarnish sounds like a good idea, too. Or, what about those
anti-tarnish sheets I’ve seen reference to?

Christine in Littleton, Massachusetts, USA, where it’s wonderfully
but unseasonably cool.


#9

Hi Karen, The washing/baking soda was a recommendation from John
Burgess several years ago in this forum and that’s what I have been
using ever since. However, don’t leave turquoise, malachite, lapis
etc. in very long because it will eat into the stone. Just stay there
and watch 'til the silver is clean and then pull out and rinse off.

For the person whose silver plate didn’t get clean - it might be that
the plate had worn so thin that the base metal was showing through.

I’ve used this on jewelry, sterling silver pitchers and even on a 15"
dia silver tray which hadn’t been used in abut four years and was as
black as coal. I will note that the aluminum plates people sell at
gem shows did not work nearly as well as plain old aluminum foil.

Nancy
Nancy Bernardine-Widmer
Bernardine Fine Art Jewelry
http://www.bernardine.com


#10
    Ok, I've read so many replies saying that the soda/aluminium
foil/warm water trick works like magic, that I have to say that
when I tried it, on old silver-plated flatware, it didn't work 

G’day Christine Quiiry; Washing soda is sodium carbonate Baking
soda is sodium BIcarbonate Washing soda is the more alkaline; baking
powder won’t work very well with aluminium as a tarnish remover. Both
are very cheap from the supermarket. Throw the solution away when
you’ve done with it.

So, what are the proportions? One cup of soda to a gallon of water?

If you’re going to make up a gallon, then I’d have a stronger
solution, say about 3 cups per gallon. But I’m sure you don’t really
need a gallon. A handful in a small basin will work, but the water
must be quite hot; the addition of the washing soda crystals will cool
it quite a bit. The aluminium can be any old bit of clean grease free
aluminium scrap; kitchen foil works well. The jewellery to be cleaned
MUST also be completely grease free. Scrub it with a brush and
detergent first.

Or, what about those anti-tarnish sheets I’ve seen reference to?

There are papers available which contain chemicals which will inhibit
tarnishing. Try the jeweller’s suppliers. Some jewellers wrap their
work in such papers. – Cheers now,

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#11

Don’t substitute your favorite aluminium cook pot Just a health note:
DO NOT use aluminum for any cooking…suspected to
produce Alzheimer disease


#12
Don't substitute your favorite aluminium cook pot Just a health
note: DO NOT use aluminum for any cooking....suspected to produce
Alzheimer disease 

Once again, I’m seeking balance and at least an indication that
exhortations posted to this site aren’t just based on unsubstantiated
conjecture. The metal “trade, craft, discipline, profession” is hard
enough enough as it is without having something else to worry about.
So I did a search using Google with “some selected” results below. I
tend to be biased in favour of the medical discipline (I’m not one by
the but did work in metal toxicology) and biased against
"orthomolecular medicine". However, you too can do your own search. My
conclusion: If Alzheimer’s Disease" runs in your family, then drinking
water with high concentrations of Al might put you at an increased
risk. The cause and effect relationships simply have not been
established, although many researchers are working on the issue. For
me, I suspect that I am more at risk when I don’t use a mask during
grinding and polishing, a fan when I’m brazing, and consuming food in
a work area, than if I eat pasta cooked in an aluminum containor.

David Popham


#13
    Don't substitute your favorite aluminium cook pot Just a health
note: DO NOT use aluminum for any cooking....suspected to produce
Alzheimer disease 

Howdy Folks, OK - let’s step back for a moment and look at the SOURCE
for the statement ‘suspected to cause Alzheimer disease’. It is true
that lipofuscin plaque affected brain cells seem to have more aluminum
in them. HOWEVER - NO (repeat no) cause and effect link has been found
NOR is there a good theory on one. It is quite likely the the cells
retain aluminum BECAUSE THEIR METABOLISM IS COMPROMISED BY THE REAL
AHLZHEIMER AGENT. Aluminum is the most common metal in the earth’s
crust, the body has a good mechanism for getting rid of it and it’s
unlikely we evolved without an extreme tolerance to it. BY FAR the
number one source for ingested aluminum is OTC ant-acids. Things like
cooking and under arm deodorants (don’t get me started) are extremely
minor sources. I’m all for CONFIRMING the safety of aluminum in a
scientific manner, but the use of aluminum may very well be safer than
stainless(some people have nickel toxicity issues with some stainless)
and certainly is more ‘energy efficient’ (and less likely to crush a
toe) than cast iron. LOTS of people consumed LOTS of ant-acids and
polished LOTS of stuff with AlOx and DON"T get Ahlzheimer’s. Carl
1 Lucky Texan


#14

Hello Katherine. I have recently begun using this product and hope
that you or some other Orchid friends might help me.

How do you apply and buff the Renaissance wax? I have been using
dilute liver of sulfur to obtain a range of colors but find that
using the wax takes the patina back at least one color and severely
lessens the color intensity.

I am using a very soft cloth to apply the wax to very clean, warmed
(hairdryer) metal. The instructions say to wipe off or rub off
excess. I have tried removing excess immediately and I have tried
waiting 20" or so. Am I missing something? Should I take the patina
beyond the color of choice and put up with the immediate loss of
color intensity?

Thanks in advance.
Pam Chott
www.songofthephoenix.com


#15

I thought that it was supposed to be soda as in washing clothes.
However, I just remembered that I did have some Caligon water
softener here and tried it. Now I need to know if this is safe for
jewelry with stones in it. I would suppose that CZ’s, other man made
stones and diamonds would be fine but what about tourmaline and
malachite?

Marilyn Smith


#16
    I thought that it was supposed to be soda as in washing
clothes. However, I just remembered that I did have some Caligon
water softener here and tried it. Now I need to know if this is safe
for jewelry with stones in it. I would suppose that CZ's, other man
made stones and diamonds would be fine but what about tourmaline and
malachite? 

Malachite, turquoise, lapis, amber etc. - no, not unless you put it
in and take it out right away. I ruined the polish on a piece of
malachite because I left it in for about 10 minutes. Tried again for
just about 2 min and it was ok. Don’t know about tourmaline.

Nancy
Nancy Bernardine-Widmer
Bernardine Fine Art Jewelry
http://www.bernardine.com
nancy@bernardine.com


#17

At least you could repolish it. When are you moving? You might be
interested in offering a workshop in stone cutting at the
Indianapolis Art Center. If you are, you need to write a little resume
and a class description to send in soon. It doesn’t pay much and it’s
pretty far from Cincy. It might be that if you do, you could stay at
my daughter’s condo. Think about it.

Marilyn