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Removing cabachon


#21

Dental floss may work during the fitting stage but I don’t believe
it will help you during subsequent repair, which is the context in
which I made my warning. But that’s only half of it. The other half
is, as Leonid mentions, possible stone breakage. With sturdy stones,
no problem most of the time I suppose. When you start setting more
fragile stones, like Todd’s opals, the risk can sometimes be
intolerable. Not even going into the hammering stage, just dropping
the stone in the bezel, if its too tight you may chip the girdle.
Then again the other other half (three halves, more for your money!)
is, with a tight fitting bezel, can you really be sure the stone is
fully seated on the bearing and not just squooshed between bezel
walls? So now you have the situation where the bezel is jammed
against the girdle and when you start setting you put even more
pressure on it, or at the last moment the stone rocks out of
alignment.

Given the risks, I don’t see a positive to making press fit bezels.

Todd, I once had the daunting task of setting a scary opal in white
gold. I used 18K palladium white to make a bezel about 1mm thick,
cut a relief inside, and used a hammer handpiece. It helps to polish
the hell out of the inside of the bezel so that at least you don’t
have irregularities to deal with, the kind where you might have a
little jagged gap and be tempted to hammer just a wee bit more.
Sometimes that wee bit is a killer.


#22

Additionally, WHY do some folks make press fit bezels? Those of you
that do, what advantage do you gain? I’ve elsewhere today mentioned
the disadvantages and I just now realize that maybe if so many people
are doing this they must believe there is a sound mechanical reason
for press fit bezels. I think for it to be a sound mechanical reason
it would have to trump all the disadvantages.

So I’m setting aside my sometimes smug, 33 year school of hard
knocks attitude and wish to know. Damn, I sound old!


#23
beeswax to remove a stone from the bezel, I didn't have any
schmutz! Can you tell me where I can get a small quantity? 

Use ash, or rouge dust. You can either knead it in or melt a batch.


#24
Additionally, WHY do some folks make press fit bezels? Those of
you that do, what advantage do you gain? 

Sound technical reasons for a press fit…makes it really easy to
chip stones, impossible to test fit, not fun removing stone for
repairs. I’m sure there are others I have forgotten. A very close fit
is good, a bit of sticky wax to fix the the stone for the first
hammer blows. N0 snap fits ever by me, and that applies to all
settings not just bezels. That gut twisting crunch sound sure can
ruin an otherwise good day :slight_smile:

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#25

To go off on a tangent here, and keeping with dental floss, I’ve
used dental floss tape charged with compounds to polish the tightest
acute corners in piercings.

Mike DeBurgh, GJG
Alliance, OH


#26
That gut twisting crunch sound sure can ruin an otherwise good day
:-) 

I myself dread the tiny ‘tink’ that one feels rather than hears.


#27

This is a general note:

I use the stuff they sell in school supply displays, sometimes
called BlueTac, or bulletin board tac. It comes in flat bars and the
teachers use it for putting stuff on walls etc.

It can be used for all sorts of temporary fixes, like pulling stones
out of settings when you are testing the fit, for holding tiny
stones while you put them into bezels, etc. I also use a wedge of the
stuff to stop a small anvil from moving around while whacking
something…you get the idea. It is cheap, non-toxic, doesn’t matter
how dirty it gets unless you get metal bits stuck in it. In other
words, use it much like beeswax.

N. Katsu


#28

The very best material for picking up stones is the red wax around
Edam cheese!

Tony Konrath


#29

For fitting and removing a cabachon, especially if it’s too tight, I
don’t think anything beats synthetic sinew. It’s wax coated, and
unbreakable. I cut a small length, press the back of a bench knife
to it to flatten it, then lay it across the bezel cup, snap the cab
into the bezel cup. When removing the cab, pull the two ends together
and pull. Even a too tight fitting cab pops out undamaged.

John Barton


#30
For fitting and removing a cabachon, especially if it's too tight,
I don't think anything beats synthetic sinew. It's wax coated, and
unbreakable. I cut a small length, press the back of a bench knife
to it to flatten it, then lay it across the bezel cup, snap the cab
into the bezel cup. When removing the cab, pull the two ends
together and pull. Even a too tight fitting cab pops out undamaged. 

Yeah, I use a double fold of dental floss and it does the trick too.
Great thing to know because whether you like to admit it or not, now
and again we do get the stones “stuck” if we are not careful.

Thanks John, and next time I find some sinew I’ll try it. Sounds
probably a bit stronger than the floss, though that has worked for
me for years.

bericho


#31
....and next time I find some sinew I'll try it. Sounds probably a
bit stronger than the floss, though that has worked for me for
years. 

Where does one find synthetic sinew? Vince


#32

Where does one find synthetic sinew?

You can buy this from Crazy Crow (Indian crafts supply) Pottsboro,
TX, also from Indian Jewelers Supply or probably Thunderbird Jewelry
Supply also (both out of NM). Oh yeah, The Leather Factory in Ft.
Worth, TX, & many other locations, also Tandy’s.

Sharon Perdasofpy


#33

Vince,you can find artificial sinew (I had referred to it as
synthetic) http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/83

at and click on leather lacing-stitching. The item number is
#11208-00 it is $25.00 a roll. (very large) enough to supply
everybody in Texas [G] I first started using it when I tooled
leather belts,etc many years ago. When needed, like genuine sinew, it
can be split down the middle after being flattened.

Hope this helps.
John Barton


#34

animal intestines. Check your local butcher. My husbands friend owns
a deer cooler and during deer season you can get all you want.
Outside of deer season you have to wait for whenever someone wants a
cow or pig butchered.

Val


#35

You can also use Dental Floss, much cheaper, and available anywhere.
I keep a roll on my workbench, and put in underneath every cab when
fitting. If you like the fit, and are ready to use the Bexel Pusher,
just pull on the end, and out it comes.

randy
http://www.rocksmyth.com


#36

I almost always do either of these things:

Drill holes in the bezel backplate or do decorative piercing on the
bezel backplate. If the cab is small, sometimes i only drill one hole
through the back plate and through the center of the ring shank. If
the cab is larger, i might drill (2) holes through the
bezelbackplate, one located either side of where the ring shank is
soldered onto the bezel backplate. I do the drilling (or decorative
piercing) before soldering the backplate to the shank.

Either way you have an open place to push up and out on the cab to
remove it. I like a tight fitting bezel… makes it smoother though
maybe a bit harder to fit.

I prefer the decorative piercing… and the customers are usually
delighted with it.

steve


#37

I am piping in late here and I am not sure if this trick has been
shared:

When in a pinch once, I used a bit of glue or even use of dopping wax
on a stick, (which was suggested to me by my professor), when I had
to remove a stone that I had placed in my bezel thinking I was ready
to set it, but I ended up having to get it back out for a last minute
adjustment to my piece. I simply placed super glue on a nail and
waited until it hardened sufficiently to pull out the stone. Normally
I either use the dental floss trick or I have pre-drilled a tiny hole
in the back plate where I can insert a pin to push out my stone.
Sometimes I do not want a hole visible from the back, so that is when
I use floss. But this trick works well if you think you were ready to
set and inserted your stone only to find you have to get it back out
somehow.

Best,
Teresa