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Refurbishing old hammers


#1

A few day ago there was an a comment on a truly magical chemical
that would swell the wooden handle of a hammer into the metal hammer
head and keep it firmly attached!!! The author cautioned that one
should not apply more than one drop!!

I believe the name was something like “lock-tite”

Now, I cannot find the comment again to ask the author where he
bought this magical product.

Please help by giving me a source for this truly wonderful elixer!!!
(I’ve tried hardware stores in south Florida to no avail. They too
would like to stock such!) Please, please, please!!!

Tom Stringfellow in sunny South Florida…just swinging my hammers
and losing my heads.


#2
    A few day ago there was an a comment on a truly magical
chemical that would swell the wooden handle of a hammer into the
metal hammer head and keep it firmly attached!!! 

I noticed that too, but I failed to save it. Until you find it, you
can do as I do. I always used to soak the hammers, handles, heads
and all, in automotive anti-freeze. Don’t use water, it just dries
out and makes things worse. If you try this, make certain that you
keep the container where pets can’t get at it. Dogs, especially,
like to drink the stuff, and it’s deadly for them.

David L. Huffman
David L. Huffman Studios, Inc.


#3

Tom, When this topic came up in my jewelry class the other night, our
prof. recommended common anti-freeze (soak the hammer head in it, and
it permanently swells the wood). Haven’t personally tried it, but
she swears by it.

Good luck!
Karen Goeller
@Karen_Goeller


#4
     A few day ago there was an a comment on a truly magical
chemical that would swell the wooden handle of a hammer into the
metal hammer head and keep it firmly attached!!!  The author
cautioned that one should not apply more than one drop!! 

It is sold under the brand name of “Chair-Loc” (or “Lock”). You can
find it in stores or catalogs that cater to woodworkers, who use it
to swell the ends of the spindles in chair legs and such.

I am told that a trick used by modern blacksmiths is to put thier
hammers, head end down, into a shallow pan of auto antifreeze, enough
to submerge the head. This is supposed to swell the handle tightly
into the eye of the head, securing it tightly and permanantly. I’ve
never tried it, but was told that it works great by someone who does
it regularly.

Hope that helps,
-AL


#5

I did mention that I used something called Chair Loc on my hammer
handles. I made a mistake in sending out that brand name, because
that was an old product I used years ago and have since replaced
with a newer product. I never went into my studio to check out the
brand name on the product I currently use. Sorry for the confusion
and difficulty in locating it.

Here, in fact, is the name of that product…“Bondex Wood Swell &
Lock”. You might try buying it at Woodworker’s Warehouse or Home
Depot. If you can’t find it at these types of stores, Bondex, Inc is
located in St Louis, MO so you might be able to check with them and
find out where they distribute the product.

Linda Kaye-Moses


#6

Refurbishing old hammers

I lived for years in the Nevada desert with humidity in the single
digits. Hammerheads fall off just picking them up sometimes. I tried
the anti-freeze method and that works if you soak them on a regular
basis. The best way I have found is to soak the handle and head in an
inch or so of boiled linseed oil. If you leave them in the oil, you
will see the oil creep up past the head into the handle portion. This
may take a week or more. Remove from the linseed oil and wipe dry.
Boiled linseed oil has hardening additives that will keep the head
tight for years.

Rx in Montana


#7

Another simple solution is to drive a nail or two into the portion
of the handle extending into the head.

Lee Einer