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Recommendations on a scroll saw?


#1

I was hoping for your recommendations.

I am in the market for a scroll saw to cut cast acrylic for
hydraulic press use, to cut intricate copper and silver designs to
sweat solder to a precious metal base, to cut 1/4" steel sheet to
make cutting dies to use in hydraulic press, (and so on) and
wondered if any of the group felt it was prudent to spend the money
to buy the best (Hegner, Hawk, Excallibur?) or whether a cheepo model
would likely do just as well. I have searched the archives and found
very little though I did find that John Burgess has made his own
from a sewing machine motor (I am not competent to make my own) and
that at least one of you previously spoke favorably about an
Excallibur scroll saw.

A few years ago I purchased a variable speed scroll saw (used) but
originally sold by Frye and Borel in Oakland. Manufacturer is not
identified on the saw. I purchased it through an ad in the SNAG
newsletter and paid about $150. I finally gave up trying to use it in
total frustration (as did my jewelry making friends after trying to
give it a go). I think the problem was one of tension (or improper
tension) of the blades but for the life of me no one I knew could
make it work. The blades broke about every 1/4 inch no matter what I
tried. I am ready emotionally and financially to try again and hoped
I could benefit from the experience of some of you.

Sheridan Reed


#2

Sheridan,

You might want to contact Lee Marshall of Bonny Doon. He had a
prototype machine at Rio Grande’s Catalog in Motion in Tucson this
past February. I don’t know what it will cost, but it was very
responsive. It had easy to change blades. The table could be angled
to cut pancake/RT dies. The work piece could be maneuvered by
guiding with your two hands. The best way to describe cutting with
the saw was like guiding fabric on a sewing machine. It had a foot
pedal.

Cynthia Eid might be able to tell you more about Lee’s saw as she
was working the show. I think Brian Marshall may have posted a
review on the saw after the Tucson Show.

Donna Shimazu


#3

I have owned and tried several different scroll saws. The Hawk was
by far the best for cutting metal that I have tried. With that said
the new Bonny Doon Engineering power saw is even better. but costs
significantly more but if you are looking for a professional tool it
is the one to buy.

Jim Binnion

James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau


#4
You might want to contact Lee Marshall of Bonny Doon. He had a
prototype machine at Rio Grande's Catalog in Motion in Tucson this
past February. I don't know what it will cost, but it was very
responsive. 

I also tried this machine at SNAG-- I loved it, though I can’t
really say I need it. As I recall, the price is about $1500. It
seemed like a solid, well-engineered tool. I will say, though, that
it didn’t go very fast. It seemed to me that it would be a godsend
to anyone whose body is unduly stressed by sawing, but I’m not sure
it would speed things up any.

–Noel


#5

Hi, At the SNAG conference in Cleveland, Lee Marshall demonstrated a
type of “scroll” saw that he designed. It held standard jewelers
blades. I did try it out at the conference and it cut very smoothly
and was easy to use. I did not brake a blade even making sharp
turns. Dianne deBeixedon

You might contact Lee Marshall and check out the saw - his contact
is:

Bonny Doon Engineering, Inc.
250 Tassett Ct.
Bonny Doon, CA 95060

Information: 831-423-1023
Sales: 800-995-9962
Fax: 831-423-1605

#6

Hi, the saws that were in Tucson went a bit too fast. The one at
SNAG was a bit too slow. The ones that people who have bought the
saw will receive will be “Juuuuust right” as the Goldilocks says.
Cindy

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com/


#7

Is this the Bonny Doon saw? I tried to find it online but couldn’t.
Not even at Rio Grande. Can anyone direct me?

Lee


#8

In case a clarification is needed: The speed of the New Concept Saw
by Bonny Doon is variable, controlled by a foot pedal (like we use
with a flexible shaft). When I said that the speed will now be just
right, I was referring to the maximum speed. Cindy

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com/


#9

I attended the SNAG conference a couple of weeks ago in Cleveland,
OH. This saw was there! It worked like a sewing machine, reostat
foot control, blade went up and down at a reasonable rate, there was
a plate on which you put the metal. VERY, VERY,Very easy to use. I
used it without difficulty. I’m saving my pennies to buy one,
hopefully, soon!


#10
       I attended the SNAG conference a couple of weeks ago in
Cleveland, OH.  This saw was there!  It worked like a sewing
machine, reostat foot control, blade went up and down at a
reasonable rate, there was a plate on which you put the metal.
VERY, VERY,Very easy to use.  I used it without difficulty.  I'm
saving my pennies to buy one, hopefully, soon!  

Can this scroll saw be seen online?

Lee


#11

Some small changes have been added to the Bonny Doon power saw…
the speed that it was demonstrated with at the SNAG show is now the
"midrange". Using a “Lowboy” foot control off of a flexshaft
machine it runs slow enough or fast enough for almost everyone.
There is a new spring loaded pressure foot that guides the sawblade
as it holds the work in place. Just little tweaks and improvements
that Lee keeps coming up with… And yes, as Noel mentioned earlier,
the thing is incredible for someone like me - who has a few
physical limitations. I have not been able to make a pancake die
for several years, now I can. Made enough of them in one week to
pay for the saw. If anyone is in my area and would like to come try
one out you are welcome to. As I said in an earlier post - bring
your blades and material to cut. Call first to make sure our
watches are synchronized…

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts School
Stockton, CA USA
209-477-0550
instructor@jewelryartschool.com
jewelryartschool@aol.com


#12

but a regular table saw and but a flex shaft foot pedat on it, a
cheaper option, around $100 for the whole ring im sure


#13

I’ve been using a Dremel variable speed scroll saw with some success,
but hand sawing is just as quick and more accurate. The main reason
is that the blade stroke is only an inch or inch-and-a-half. What is
the stroke length of the machine shown at SNAG?

Edward


#14

Thank you very much to everyone who replied to my “scroll saw” post.
I have called Lee Marshall and spoken to him about the saw and based
upon what he said and what all of you have said, the new Bonny Doon
saw is definitely the one I want and I will wait and save for it.
There have been questions about whether it can be seen online - I
believe the answer is “not yet”. I understood Lee to say he didn’t
have it up on his website yet and it is entirely too new to be in
anyone else’s catalog such as Rio Grande. Thank you again.
Orchid is such a wonderful resource. Sherry


#15

Lee Marshall designed the new power saw to maximize the cutting
length available on jewelers saw blades. I’ve run mine with blades
from #1 to 5/0. This afternoon I intend to try it with 8/0 & 10/0
blades.

There is an old posting in the forum at the Bonny Doon website that
illustrates the prototype for those of you who have not seen one at
Tucson or SNAG. Look for the Feb. 20th, '05 posting by Lee
Marshall.

And no, we don’t think we are related, though we did have a long
conversation about it at lunch yesterday… there is also a Brian
Marshall in England whom we both know…

Brian P. Marshall
Stockton Jewelry Arts School
Stockton, CA USA
209-477-0550
instructor@jewelryartschool.com
jewelryartschool@aol.com


#16
What is the stroke length of the machine shown at SNAG? 

Hi! One of the great things about Bonny Doon’s New Concept Saw is
that it uses the entire length of the blade.

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com/


#17

I’m coming in a bit late to this discussion (taking an intense
week-long knifemaking workshop - what fun, but I’m way behind on
e-mail!). I noticed that this Bonny Doon saw has a foot-pedal speed
control and wondered: what is the minimum speed of the saw? Would
it be able to cut heavy steel stock?

Thanks for any info and experiences you can share.

Cheers,
Jessee Smith
www.silverspotstudio.com
Cincinnati, Ohio


#18
 I noticed that this Bonny Doon saw has a foot-pedal speed control
and wondered:   what is the minimum speed of the saw? Would it be
able to cut heavy steel stock? 

It cuts at a much lower number of strokes per minuet than a a
typical scroll saw but it uses the majority of the blade length.
Where a scroll saw typically has a 3/4 to 1 inch stroke so the Bonny
Doon saw uses 3 to 4 inches of the blade so the rate of cutting is
similar but you do not wear out the blade nearly as fast. It is much
more like a powered jewelers saw than any other saw I have tried. I
cant give you in depth info yet as mine has not arrived yet (just
ordered last week) and I only have used the prototype he was showing
at Tucson. It will cut anything you can cut with a jewelers saw,
annealed steel should be no problem. It allows you to use both hands
to guide the work and your foot to control the rate of cut with a
pedal like a flex shaft uses. I can’t wait to get mine.

Jim Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau


#19
 I noticed that this Bonny Doon saw has a foot-pedal speed control
and wondered:   what is the minimum speed of the saw? Would it be
able to cut heavy steel stock? 

Hi, Lee Marshall told me that while he was at SNAG in Cleveland,
demoing the New Concept Saw, he was able to cut a 3/8" square mokume
rod for Bill Seely, of Reactive Metals. He was using a 1/0 blade at
the time, and just used that blade that was already in the saw. He
says that the speed goes down so slow that you can count the teeth
as they go by, and the power at that speed is still unstoppable.

Cynthia Eid
www.cynthiaeid.com