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Proper storage of chemicals

I have started to get a bit of a collection of chemicals and
alcohols in my studio and am wondering if I should have some special
storage for them in consideration of safety. I guess the two
biggest worries are - children getting access to them (this
SHOULDN’T happen in my studio… but who knows) and in the case of
there being a fire they would be a concern as both fuel and as
potentially explosive.

So, my first question is whether special storage is necessary or
desirable. Then the second question is - what kind of storage
arrangements would be suitable?

R.R. Jackson

R.R.

    So, my first question is whether special storage is necessary
or desirable.  Then the second question is - what kind of storage
arrangements would be suitable? 

What chemicals are you storing? There are lots of different storage
methods and rules.

Jerry

So, my first question is whether special storage is necessary or
desirable.  Then the second question is - what kind of storage
arrangements would be suitable? 

Hi R.R.,

See this page at Ganoksin for detailed on storage:

I have seen old refrigerators (unplugged) used for chemical storage,
as a lock can be attached to the door, they are insulated and thick.
You would of course have to be concerned about incompatible chemicals
(also notes on the above page) best

charles

    I have seen old refrigerators (unplugged) used for chemical
storage, as a lock can be attached to the door, they are insulated
and thick. You would of course have to be concerned about
incompatible chemicals (also notes on the above page) best 

I like the refrigerator idea. Thanks for that. But wouldn’t
ventilation be lacking?

Stephen Walker

Hello Orchidland,

GOOD questions. John Burgess, our resident chemical wizard, what is
your input?

Fire inspectors commonly evaluate chemical storage areas, so I called
ours. He said that the inoperable refrigerator could be approved for
use, but that secondary containment to keep chemical classes separate
inside is needed. Otherwise, you could have chemicals reacting in the
refrigerator. He also said venting to the outside is safest, but if
the alternative is open shelf storage, the unvented 'frig would at
least contain most fumes… until the door was opened! In general,
acids and bases should be stored on the lowest level, and separated
to avoid mixing in the event of leakage.

I don’t have room for a chemical cabinet, so I “nest” each chemical
bottle in a sturdy plastic container for secondary containment of
possible leaks and to decrease the likelihood of knocking something
over. Takes up a little more space, but gives some piece of mind.

Judy in Kansas, where it’s been raining buckets. Flood warnings for
low-lying areas and creeks - several are dealing with basement
leaks!