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Previewing digital images


#1

Hi, just a question to all the digi photo people out there in orchid
land. I am wondering if it is possible to hook a digital camera up to
your tv set or computer to preview the subject before taking the
shot. I would love to be able to check the shot first.

I have a Nikon coolpix 5000 plus a Nikon coolpix 8800 [ new toy] and
have an AV connection and can play back images while they are still
on the memory card but I am not sure if it is possible to do this
before the image is taken.

Maybe this is not possible but if it is I am sure someone on this
forum will know.

Thankyou in advance
Christine from Lightning Ridge


#2

I can’t tell you about Nikon, but Canon has software, which we use,
that let’s you take pictures using the computer to drive the camera -
basically a remote shutter, but you can also set the macro, exposure
compensation, ISO, etc. It’s cool.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#3

Hi Christine,

I have a Nikon coolpix 5000 plus a Nikon coolpix 8800 [ new toy]
and have an AV connection and can play back images while they are
still on the memory card but I am not sure if it is possible to do
this before the image is taken. 

What you’re talking about is a function called “remote capture”. My
experience with it has only been the Canon “A” series cameras (A630,
A640, etc). Canon uses your computer, however, and you actually
control the entire exposure from there. The exposure, once made, goes
directly onto your hard drive bypassing the camera’s memory card.

I think several of the SLR type digicams have the funtion as well
but I’m unfamiliar with which.

Unless you do a lot of shots in a single session it is almost as
easy to do a test shot, remove the memory card and view it on your
computer via a card reader, replace the card and finalize the shot.

You can also review your shots right on the camera using the zoom
function to check critical focus in any area of the shot. It all
depends on how large your camera’s LCD is - not as handy on the older
small ones.

Les Brown
L.F.Brown Goldwork
17 2nd St. East, Ste. 101
Kalispell, MT 59901


#4

You have the A/V jack for the TV/computer part, with another end
that will fit into a mono or USB plug on your camera. It’s easier to
use a TV than a computer to compose in real time.

The disadvantage with the computer is that you have to push keys on
the keyboard before you can take your picture (or at least with my
various digital cameras), and the advantage is, if you’re really into
computer graphics, you can calibrate your monitor to match the colors
you’re seeing in the actual piece.

Of course the TV will not be able to be calibrated, so the colors or
contrast may be slightly off, so do some test shots and have them
printed at a good photo processor, so you can take any of those
factors into consideration. Most TVs sold for the past few years have
A/V jacks either to the side or in the front, for just this purpose
and previewing movies.

Most mainstream cameras have both of these options available.


#5

While we’re on the subject of digital know-how…

I’d like to try to make instructional DVD’s for some of the projects
I teach around the country. Has anyone done this? I’d like to know
the easiest way to go about it, ideally without much investment in
eqipment.

Thanks!
Noel


#6
I'd like to try to make instructional DVD's for some of the
projects 

I haven’t gone that far, but I’ve made DVD’s. All you really need is
DVD authoring software - Roxio, Ulead, Adobe all have them. Then you
get your content - videos, stills, and put them into menus, and you
write any content. It can be time consuming, but it’s basically
drag-and-drop Then the authoring software makes the DVD. Something to
understand: A computer DVD can have anything from data to video. A
home DVD player is different. The authoring program takes your
content, even video, and makes a movie out of THAT. A slide show is a
movie with the slides and transitions as frames. That’s why you can’t
play computer DVD’s at home on your player.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#7

I’ve heard that Nikon has something like this too, but don’t know
its name…

Ivy


#8
Something to understand: A computer DVD can have anything from
data to video. A home DVD player is different. The authoring
program takes your content, even video, and makes a movie out of
THAT. A slide show is a movie with the slides and transitions as
frames. That's why you can't play computer DVD's at home on your
player. 

You CAN do this on some of the newer players, like mine. Authoring
software is changing as well. In a year or two you won’t even be
able to buy a DVD player that doesn’t play what you create on your
home computer, PC or MAC. Hard to keep up!

Wayne