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Polishing


#1

They (whoevever THEY are) say there are no stupid questions. So be kind and
bear this in mind when you read mine!

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It works great,
but I spend more time on the floor looking for my pieces than I do polishing.
Please, O Friends of Orchid, tell me what I am doing wrong and give me tips
or techniques to prevent this. Pieces flung against the wall after they have
spun out of my fingers certainly have that “flawed” look everyone has been
discussing in another thread!

Thanks,
Candy


#2

Oh Candy,

Can I relate you flying jewelry off my polishing laps. And I have a drawer
full of dinged/flawed jewelry that hasn’t seen the light of day - that
because of this run of “flawed” hand crafted look- maybe I should look at
again.

My only advise to you is my mantra when I am polishing-- Light touch , go
slow, be careful LESS IS BEST - I can’t tell you the number of pieces in my
learning process that I have "Finished " into oblivion. After a class with
John Cogswell, I think a brass brushed finish is just great!!!

Good luck and Be Careful

Joan


#3

If pieces are being flung out of your hand, then you need to re-think
your polishing technique.

Cardinal rule # 1 - Hold the work to be polished near the bottom of the
wheel, a little towards you (at around 4-5 o’clock position. NEVER
hold the work at the top portion of the wheel ; The item will tend to
jump out of your hands.

Cardinal rule # 2. Never polish a chain if you are an inexperienced
polisher. Having a chain snag the wheel is not a pretty sight. I have
heard of serious injuries happening.

Remember that the larger diameter the wheel, the faster it is spinning.
You may want to perfect your technique using 3-4 inch buffs at first.
Ringold’s Jewelers since 1908 9865 Bustleton Ave/ Phila, PA 19115
215-671-8190 Fax: 215-969-1803 Ringold@IX.netcom.com
Http://home.aol.com/REGALITE
Manufacturing / Mining / Product Development


#4

At 10:13 AM 12/5/96 -0500, you wrote:

They (whoevever THEY are) say there are no stupid questions. So be kind and
bear this in mind when you read mine!

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It works great,
but I spend more time on the floor looking for my pieces than I do polishing.
Please, O Friends of Orchid, tell me what I am doing wrong and give me tips
or techniques to prevent this. Pieces flung against the wall after they have
spun out of my fingers certainly have that “flawed” look everyone has been
discussing in another thread!

Thanks,
Candy

Dear Candy,
I must firstly quote to you from the illustrious Homer Simpson …“Doh!”
…that says it all, don’t you think? heh heh :vP
I always found that when I’m going against the wheel, I gently cradle the piece with my fingertips, and proceed to the lower middle of the wheel, and let the compound on the wheel do the cutting/polishing, and never press into the wheel, because pressing hard into the wheel creates the friction+pressure that grabs your piece. A good thing to do is to keep the wheel fully charged with compound several times throughout your time at the wheel…and be patient, don’t “hurry up to make a mistake”…be gentle and enjoy your craft that you love and do so well!..ok …ok …I’ll climb off the soap box now and crawl around on my hands and knees looking for MY piece that just flew! @ingot
==>hot metal,is so cool!<==


#5

discussing tumble polishing…I have used vibratory and rotary tumblers.
Really acan’t tell the difference in final product. Buy Stainless steel
shot! It’s worth every penny you pay for it- you don’t have to do all that
cleaning and storing stuff like the regular, (which always seems to end up
rusting anyhow). I do clean mine occasionally with a solution of 409 and
water- it seems to pick up rubber crud from the tumbling container.


#6

Candy wrote:

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It works
great,
but I spend more time on the floor looking for my pieces than I do
polishing.
Please, O Friends of Orchid, tell me what I am doing wrong and give me
tips
or techniques to prevent this. Pieces flung against the wall after they
have
spun out of my fingers certainly have that “flawed” look everyone has
been
discussing in another thread!

Thanks,
Candy

Candy:

I do not know what kind of pieces you are buffing. One thing that could
possibly help is to design some simple pieces in brass or bronze and in
some quantity (something real simple, like 25 of something) and then just
sit down and buff (sort of a buff-a-thon). The wheel will teach you what
you need to know. The angle you hold the piece to the wheel is important.
The type of wheel you use for different areas of the piece is important
also. Buffing production style is the fastest way to gain experience.
Production style buffing also helps to develop speed and efficiency.

It is also important to understand what is going on in a somewhat molecular
level. What is the buffing wheel and compound doing to your jewelry piece
and how is it doing it? Learn to visualize what you can’t see happening to
your piece in your mind. Believe it or not this really helps.

Another consideration is design. Are you having problems buffing because of
design? Are your buffing wheels able to reach the areas you are trying to
buff?

One thing I do to help minimize buffing is tumbling. Many jewelers I know
do not tumble because they do not get the finish they want through
tumbling. Many of our designs are of this nature. However, I still tumble
them and save 30% to 40% off of the buffing time. This means I don’t have
to buff edges and backs of many pieces.

FWIW I still have pieces thrown by the wheel even after buffing for 20
years. I have literally gotten the jitters after having large cuff
bracelets thrown a couple of times in a row. (BAM!!!)

Another thing that could help is insulating your fingers from the heat of
the piece being buffed. We use rubber finger cots and a small tub of water.
When I buff larger pieces such as bracelets I use rubber finger cots inside
leather finger cots. The bracelets usually get hot enough to sizzle the
water. Always use finger cots and never use gloves. GLOVES CAN GET CAUGHT
ON THE WHEEL OR SPINDLE AND MANGLE YOUR HAND.

Kenneth Gastineau
@Kenneth_Gastineau1

From: Candyce05@aol.com
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: Polishing
Date: Thursday, December 05, 1996 10:13 AM

They (whoevever THEY are) say there are no stupid questions. So be kind
and
bear this in mind when you read mine!

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures


#7

They (whoevever THEY are) say there are no stupid questions. So be kind and
bear this in mind when you read mine!

I purchased a bench grinder for polishing about a month ago. It works great,
but I spend more time on the floor looking for my pieces than I do polishing.
Please, O Friends of Orchid, tell me what I am doing wrong and give me tips
or techniques to prevent this. Pieces flung against the wall after they have
spun out of my fingers certainly have that “flawed” look everyone has been
discussing in another thread!

Thanks,
Candy

Candy,

Get a Kirkland ring clamp for the rings and hollow stuff. Try a "yellow,
treated, stiched muslin buff (most any supplier will have them). Lastly,
it is know as the “Jewelers Prayer” being down on the floor looking for
that &@#%$& little thing!

Good luck,

John and Cynthia (this info was given to me by Cynthia)

John Dach and Cynthia Thomas
Maiden Metals
a div. of Strength of vision is important,
MidLife Crisis Enterprises but so is the ability
PO BX 44 to see things as they really are.
Philo, CA 95466
707-895-2635(phone/fax)
@John_Cynthia_MidLife


#8

Hi all, I would be interested to hear how people deal with
polishing dust etc. I mean, what kind of extraction fans and
systems do people use to deal with this problem?

Richard
UK


#9
Hi all, I would be interested to hear how people deal with
polishing dust etc. I mean, what kind of extraction fans and
systems do people use to deal with this problem?

Hi Richard, A household vacuum cleaner that requires dust bags
will be perfect for dust collection in small production
workshops. I use an Electrolux vac cleaner to suck up all dusts.
You can improvise a cabinet to house your polishing motor and
stick the nozzle of the vac cleaner close to the buffing wheel.
The resultant suction of a household vac may not be powerful
enough but it should be sufficient to suck up 60% of the dust
during polishing. The rest of the scattered dust can be
vaccuumed after you’ve finished polishing. When I’ve collected a
substantial amount (like ‘two bags full’), I send it to the
refiners.

Joseph Chin
@Joseph_Chin


#10

just out of curiousity- is it really worth your while to have
two bags of shop dust refined? So far, I;ve only worked in
silver, so I have’nt yet gotten obsessive about saving dust.
(That’s a concept- I’ll tell everyone my house is dirty because
I’m saving all that valuable dust!)

Anne Stickney


#11

We use an under the counter 1/2 hp. dust collecter that we
bought from Gesswein (I can’t recall the maker but Handler also
makes a nice one). It has been excellent. We do about 9,000 jobs
a year and that thing really sucks up the dust! We paid about
$700.00. I highly reccomend it, it is as effective that some of
the larger models costing more than twice as much.

Mark P.


#12

Whats all the fuss over matte finishes vs high shine finishes? I
get no greater pleasure than when I sit at the split lap machine
and apply a mirror finish on a peice that I have labored for
hours over. I don’t know about the rest of you, but I find it
harder to hide any mistakes when applying a mirror finish. The
peice has to be perfect in all respects; no excess solder, no
porosity, no file marks or dents, etc. A satin, brush, matte,
blasted, florentine, stone, etc. finish can hide many defects.
Anyway…Time to get off my high horse now! Ken


#13

Ken-Amen Brother! Shine on. I used more words to attempt to
say the same thing.

Lewis


#14

Whats all the fuss over matte finishes vs high shine finishes? I
get no greater pleasure than when I sit at the split lap machine
and apply a mirror finish on a peice that I have labored for
hours over. I don’t know about the rest of you, but I find it
harder to hide any mistakes when applying a mirror finish. The
peice has to be perfect in all respects; no excess solder, no
porosity, no file marks or dents, etc. A satin, brush, matte,
blasted, florentine, stone, etc. finish can hide many defects.
Anyway…Time to get off my high horse now! Ken

Dear Ken:

I know where you are coming from-however for the sake of
"Profit" (evil word!!) I can’t be polishing until the cows come
home on every piece. I am a very neat solderer and I always
cover my pieces with masking tape when I am filing and sanding so
I don’t accidentally mark up the side of the piece I am not
working on…I never used a matte finish to hide mistakes…but
know that I know what a Florentine finish is I am tempted to hide
accidentally scratches with this method!!!I just seem to like
matte better- what is the word high fashion types use to describe
something they like —it is more “modern”…

DeDe


#15

Whats all the fuss over matte finishes vs high shine finishes? I
get no greater pleasure than when I sit at the split lap machine
and apply a mirror finish on a peice that I have labored for
hours over. I don’t know about the rest of you, but I find it
harder to hide any mistakes when applying a mirror finish. The
peice has to be perfect in all respects; no excess solder, no
porosity, no file marks or dents, etc. A satin, brush, matte,
blasted, florentine, stone, etc. finish can hide many defects.
Anyway…Time to get off my high horse now! Ken

Dear Ken,

I know a high polish is a pain in the a**, especially on silver,
but I make sure my apprentices can produce a perfect mirror
finish on a piece just for the sport of it. I usually use a
combination of high polished and deep textures in my work. You
are correct that a texture can hide defects in craftsmenship,
but I feel it is better to work to perfect the craftmenship
first, than I can feel good about applying a texture knowing I
had that choice. (now I’ll get off MY high horse LOL) Wendy
Newman


#16

Hi, all

For all the years i’ve been doing jewelery work, i’ve never
succeeded in getting a mirror polish on a flat disc of sterling.
There always seems to be lines, or scratch marks on the piece
when i’;m finished. Any professional hints?

Thanks
Allan Freilich


#17

For all the years i’ve been doing jewelery work, i’ve never
succeeded in getting a mirror polish on a flat disc of sterling.
There always seems to be lines, or scratch marks on the piece
when i’;m finished. Any professional hints?

Dear Allan:

Use your sand paper first and sand, sand, sand to get all the
scratches out, triploi and then polish, polish, polish with your
rouge…


#18

For all the years i’ve been doing jewelery work, i’ve never
succeeded in getting a mirror polish on a flat disc of sterling.
There always seems to be lines, or scratch marks on the piece
when i’;m finished. Any professional hints?

It depends on what kind of lines and scratch marks you have. If
they are deep then you need to look at the prepolish steps. If
you are trying to go from a cutting compound directly to rouge
then you need to add an intermediate step. I would suggest at
least three steps depending on the original surface and
individual piece. The first step should use a cutting compound
such as grey star, bobbing compound, or tripoli. I use grey star
the most on laps, bobbing compound on brushes, and I don’t use
tripoli at all. After cleaning you need to use an intermediate
such as Zam or brightcut yellow. Fabuluster is an intermediate,
but don’t use it on silver. The heat of the silver causes the
Fabuluster to plasticize and coat the piece with an hard coat of
compound that is difficult to deal with. Clean again and rouge.
If the lines you are talking about are faint and shallow then
this step is your problem. You must use a clean soft buff and
not too much rouge. The most common error people make when
polishing is useing too much rouge. Just a quick touch on the
buff will do it. For the buff you want a soft cotton buff. I
think stitched buffs give better control and less over polish,
but some prefer unstitched for final rouge. Use a buff rake or
hacksaw blade to comb the edge of the buff. I find that a new
buff will take a little time to break in even after combing,
can’t explain that. Rio sells a buff called a System 3 white
buff. It is very soft and makes an excellent rouge buff. The
problem is that the center is soft and will become too big
before the buff is used up. But they are cheaper than a regular
rouge buff so I quess that’s OK. Buff in alternate directions
with decreasing amounts of pressure and eventually the lines
should be gone. If you have deeper lines, then go back to a
coarser compound. Don’t try to rouge out deep scratches, it
won’t work.

Brett
Split Image Contracting


#19

Hi,

concerning the System 3 buff from Rio( or any buff that gets
soft in the middle), soak in some super glue around the hole on
both sides and that should fix the problem. An alternative is
to glue 2 fibre or leather washers to each side of the buff.
Good luck.

Skip

                                  Skip Meister
                                NRA Endowment and
                                   Instructor
                                @Skip_Meister
                                09/04/9712:56:51

#20
. Fabuluster is an intermediate, but don't use it on silver.  

I didn’t know that Fabuluster shouldn’t be used on silver . …
what am I going to do with the tube of the stuff I just
ordered??? Will it work on Brass, Copper or Nickel-silver???
Stones? Tks