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Polishing chain


#1

Polishing chain is very risky. If the wheel catches the chain you
may not have time to move your hand away before the chain does.

I use mostly big link chains When I polish a chain I mount it to a
2" wide piece of oak about 6" long. I hammer a brad into the top
surface of one end, cut off the head off and bend it towards the end
of the board. I can hook the end of the chain on the brad and pull
the chain tight towards the other end. I polish the chain as it
rests on the board. The chain is then removed and flopped over to
allow polishing of the other side. I progressively move the chain
so that I am polishing a new section until I polish the whole thing.
The chain must be gathered behind the block of wood and held on
tightly so that there are no loose ends.

I hold the chain against the wheel so that it is parallel to the
diameter of the wheel not crosswise. You can polish a chain fairly
well by using a sunshine cloth from Rio Grande. Fold the cloth over
the chain and pull it through the cloth. This process will clean up
most chains unless it is severely blackened. The best advice is not
to polish a chain on the buffing wheel.
Lee Epperson


#2

G’day. I made a vibrating polisher from bits of junk a goodly while
ago, using small assorted steel balls, a small plastic screw top jar,
a little water and a scraping of soap. An hour (at the most) of shake
rattle and roll, a wash in a tea strainer, a dry, and there’s a
brilliant polish better than many professionals get on a buff - and
far safer too! Still use the same carbon steel balls, 5 years
later.

Cheers for now,
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua, Nelson NZ


#3

Hi John, Where did you get the steel balls, assorted sizes? And am I
to believe that you sit and shake the jar yourself, maybe while
watching TV or…? Doesn’t your arm get tired, if this
is the method?

Sharron in Kuala Lumpur enjoying the morning rain


#4

G’day; This subject is nearly done to death, but here’s a silly
little one more; no machinery whatever is required; this is a very
healthy way to polish chain. And I’m serious.

Get a small - about 200ml - screw top wide-mouthed plastic jar, and
place in it a mix of steel balls about one or two inches deep
together with your piece of well pickled, washed chain. Cover the
balls with water, add a drop of detergent and screw the lid on
tightly. Put the jar in your trouser pocket or clip it to a belt,
then do a one mile jog or power walk around the local park, but
keep away from potential muggers. When you get home puffed, make a
cup of coffee and empty the jar into a fine kitchen sieve over the
sink, then run tap water over the stuff in the sieve, pick out your
now beautifully hardened and brightly polished chain, dry it, and
there you are. Wipe the bottom of the sieve with kitchen paper
tissue and pour the balls into a small flat tray, and roll tissue
over the balls (the ones in the tray, silly) until dry. Wash and dry
the inside of the jar. Finish your coffee, and pour the balls
carefully back into the jar and screw on the top tightly. Ready for
next time. Better still, get a mate to do the jogging whilst you
check out the Orchid posts from your easy chair.

Cheers for now,
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua, Nelson NZ