Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Platinum Granulation


#1

The list of precious metals that may be used for granulation does not end
with gold and silver. I am familiar with someone who, after much
experimentation, has mastered the technique of platinum granulation.
Although I do not know the specifics, he keeps those under tight wraps ;
}, I have seen several pieces that were absolutely amazing.

Granulation techniques are not limited to 22kt gold, although this tends
to be easier for a lot of people than fine silver, sterling silver or
18kt gold, which are also great to use for granulation.

Heather Sickler
Intrica Fine Jewelry
@intrica


#2

hi heather,

i’ve experimented briefly with 18k granules with a platinum back, and it
doesn’t seem that this would be any more difficult to master than with
traditional granulation alloys. one thing for sure, it’s
extremely difficult to melt the backing

are you referring to an all platinum granulation process?

best regards,
geo fox


#3

are you referring to an all platinum granulation process?

Yes, in fact, what I am referring to is entirely platinum; platinum
granules on a platinum backing, or platinum on an 18kt or 22kt backing,
all platinum granules nonetheless. Very awesome!

Heather Sickler
Jeff Howden
Intrica Fine Jewelry
@intrica


#4

i just took some classes from GIA and i asked the instructor about an all
granulation platinum, he said there is no such thing, it can not be done.


#5

Hi,
don’t you just love proving people like that wrong?
Regards, Rex from Oz


#6

i just took some classes from GIA and i asked the instructor about an all
granulation platinum, he said there is no such thing, it can not be done.

I hate to break your instructor’s heart, but he is wrong. I have seen it
done, and expertly, and extensively, by a designer in Portland, Oregon.

Sorry to break hearts, but it is true,

Heather Sickler
Intrica Fine Jewelry
@intrica


#7

i just took some classes from GIA and i asked the instructor about an all
granulation platinum, he said there is no such thing, it can not be done.

Strange. I’ve only done a little granulation, yet, I have done a little
platinum granulation. Works fine for me.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain


phone:: 703-593-4652


#8

hi,

this means he doesn’t know about it. a little experimentation by someone
can (or already did) prove him incorrect. couldn’t one try using a backing
sheet of differing platinum alloys? it would also depend on what one calls
true granulation. before gold granulation was ‘rediscovered’, goldsmiths
were coating granules with solder filings, like most fillagree is still
being done, and producing pretty nice stuff. without a doubt, platinum
granules can be produced and can be coated with platinum solder and then
adhered to a platinum plate.

best regards,

geo fox


#9

I should apologize for my quick response regarding platinum granulation
last week. A couple of people requested further so here goes.
In the past, I have used a mixture of flux and cupric carbonate for the
little bit of granulation that I have done. In experimenting in trying to
apply differing colored granules, I have made platinum granules and
applied them to a gold base as usual. Nothing to it. After the previous
posts, I went back to my bench and rolled out some platinum sheet. Made a
few granules and applied them exactly as I have been doing my gold
granulation except that a much higher temperature is required. I would
suggest by the yellow heat that about 2,400 degrees F are required. A
thing film of pt/cu forms and the beads are bonded. The platinum seemed as
strong as ever. Hope that answers that.

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain


phone:: 703-593-4652