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Phototetching

Does anyone know of a product for a resin photoresist that is
exposed, then developed? I’ve googled many of the iron on kind, but
this just won’t pick up the detail of a photograph.

Karen

       Does anyone know of a product for a resin photoresist that
is exposed, then developed? I've googled many of the iron on kind,
but this just won't pick up the detail of a photograph. 

Karen, the old standby, before the easy iron on products, was Kodak
KPR photoresist. It’s a liquid. While liquid, stored in a brown
bottle, it’s not expecially photo sensative (but don’t store it out
in the sunlight.). You get your plates properly clean (water sheets
off, etc.), and dry. Coat the plates with the liquid, and hold then
vertically to drain, giving the thinnest possible layer. Do the
coating and drying, and subsequent handling, either in darkness, or
a standard red light photo safe light environment. Drying is speeded
with a drying box, which amounts to warm air from a hair dryer blown
into the box in which the plates are standing up on edge. After
drying, handle only in darkness or subdued red safelight
conditions. Place your hight contast negative emulsion down to the
plate, and clamp in an exposure frame for exposure. Traditionally,
exposing is done in commercial units using arc lamps, but sun lamps,
or even sun light will work. You’ll have to figure out exposure
times by trial and error if not using commercial exposure setups.
Then, in the red safelight environment again, develop the plates with
Kodak KPR developer, or another compatible developer (there are
several), allow the developed and washed plates to again dry, to
harden the resist layer, and you’re ready to etch. Done well, this
material is capable of holding microscopic details (Not sure if it is
still used in semiconductor manufacture, but at one time, it was.
Certainly, you can do plates that will print a high resolution
halftone image with ease.)

I last used this stuff in grad school, in the late 80s, so I cannot
help you with a current source, and it’s not likely to be a local
camera supply store item. Might be in a commercial graphic arts
place, and certainly is still available from the sorts of
commercial/industrial suppliers that would carry such things.
Whether you can find that just on the web, I don’t know, since it’s
not generally a consumer level item. You might try the Thomas
Register site, or just call Kodak to find a distributor near you.

Peter

Hi Karen,

Go to www.zacryl.com

I think you will find what you are looking for. I learned a lot
from them.

There is another product called Image On? I’m not sure of the name,
but it is what Linda Threadgill uses. Possibly somebody else might
know in Orchid.

-kKaren Christians
M E T A L W E R X
50 Guinan St.
Waltham, MA 02451
Ph. 781/891-3854 Fax 3857
http://www.metalwerx.com/
Jewelry/Metalarts School & Cooperative Studio

   Does anyone know of a product for a resin photoresist that is
exposed, then developed? I've googled many of the iron on kind,
but this just won't pick up the detail of a photograph. 

Try CapeFearPress.com and look for PurEtch. Not resinous, but will
pick up photo detail without too much problem. Does require
exposure, development and stop.

Hi, Karen, There’s a product called Puretch. You expose it either
with a special light (UV?) or sunlight. I got a sample a while back
to test for an article, but the instructions were not very clear (to
me), and the whole thing seemed such a hassle that I haven’t tried
it, but they claim really good resolution and detail. --Noel

Karen, Have you given any thought to using the same photo resist used
in microelectronics? The tools surrounding its use might be a
challenge for you. Visit your local university engineering college
and see if they would be willing to run a sample.

http://www.eng.yale.edu/rslab/resources/S1800seriesDataSheet.pdf

Shipley Company, LLC
455 Forest St
Marlborough, MA 01752
Telephone: 508-481-7950
Fax: 508-485-9113
Email: rperkinsATshipley.com

Email me offline if you have any questions.

Jeff Simkins