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Permanent "Wite-Out"!


#1

I’m so glad “Wite-out” was mentioned-- it reminded me that I need to
ask a question on behalf of one of my students.
This student used wite-out generously on a piece with quite a number
of solder joints, as she was afraid of pieces falling off when she
soldered other things. Now, the piece is finished, but we haven’t
been able to get the Wite-out off. We don’t have a steamer, and the
ultrasonic is a small unit, not the professional kind, but we have
tried soaking in everything we can think of, and have put it in the
ultrasonic in a baby food jar full of pickle, detergents, ammonia,
can’t think what else (one at a time), to no avail. This is a new
one on me. Any ideas? Thanks!

Noel


#2

Dear Noel,

The only thing around the house I ever found that would thin
permanent white out is nail polish thinner – ( not remover ). The
remover smells a little like bananas so maybe lacquer thinner would
work too. If it doesn’t completely remove it, it will soften it up
enough to get it off with a brass brush or tooth brush after soaking.

Best, Adrienne


#3

Was your student using the “water based” white out? That should come
off easily. The other kind emits toxic fumes when heated. I’m so
glad “Wite-out” was mentioned-- it reminded me that I need to ask a
question on behalf of one of my students. This student used wite-out
generously on a piece with quite a number of solder joints, as she
was afraid of pieces falling off when she soldered other things. Now,
the piece is finished, but we haven’t
been able to get the Wite-out off.


#4

Noel - did the student use the regular Wite Out or the water based
Wite Out. These are two different products. I always use the water
based Wite Out and have never had a problem getting it off. I’d
check the bottle and see which she used. And I’d try pickle again -
but hot pickle - maybe that’ll do it.And try brushing with a tooth
brush after soaking it for a while. Let us know when you get it off
what you did to remove it in case we ever have the same problem.

Kay


#5

Hi Noel, You might try one of the cheap battery powered tooth brushes
and soap. Crest make the Spinbrush pro that has both rotary and
reciprocating action. It works for me. Lee Epperson


#6

Noel I haven’t run into that problem; we all use the water-based
white-out. But the kind yor friend used apparently is the othe type.
Two things I would suggest trying:

  1. check the store and see if you can find a little bottle of
    whatever they sell to add to the white-out when it gets too thick
    (from sitting around so long the solvent evaporates).

  2. If you can’t find that, I should imagine about any of the common
    organic solvents would do the job. Acetone, for instance. Or
    fingernail polish remover.

Margaret


#7

Sorry about the problem your student is having. Have you tried a
wire brush? Any of the 3M abrasives? Chipping it off with an
X-acto knife? I use " Liquid Paper for Copiers" in the red label
bottle all the time. I use it to protect delicate parts & solder
joints that I might be concerned about. I drop the piece in pickle
immediately after soldering and do not have to deal with the problem
of removal. good luck. marianne hunter


#8

Hi You can use cigarette lighter fluid as a solvent for the wite-out.


#9

Thanks to those with suggestions about removing the repeatedly-heated
Wite-Out on my student’s peice. The first thing we tried today was
acetone, and it worked like a champ. Now my student can finish up her
piece-- Yay!! Orchid to the rescue again!

–No=EBl


#10

Hello all. I noted recently, at Staples store, that the water-based
Wite-out is again available in quantity and very well marked as
such. Not long ago that was not the case. So, try again. Someone
got smart !

Pat Hicks


#11
    This is a great tip, and very timely, because it sounds as
though, if you rotate the wire, it would put a point on it -- like
for a pin. 

Hi Noel, I found this a very quick way to create a long, round
taper, and superior to filing. But let me caution you. You must
secure the wire very well in the pin vice, and hold it firmly, less
the rotating disc pulls the wire out of the vice and wraps it around
the pin holding the facing abrasive discs. This is especially useful
when trying to point a light gauge wire for drawing. If you want to
point a heavier wire, such as a brooch pin or stick pin or to create
a wire for riveting I generally use the following proceduRe: 1. Make
a groove in the bench pin using a half round file with the flat
surface of the file facing away from you. In that way you develop a
vertical wall on the backside of the groove which will help
stabilize the wire as you point it.

  1. take the wire (not too long) and straighten it in the manner that
    best suits you. You can then chuck the wire into the handpiece, (be
    sure it is running true) and holding the handpiece in your left
    hand, rotate the wire slowly. Place the rotating wire into the
    groove, and holding a file on top of the wire begin filing as the
    wire rotates. I do hope this is clear, but if not contact me and
    I’ll try to communicate a clearer description. Using this procedure I
    make a very graceful and elegant shepherd’s hook as a closure.