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Pendant using broken heirloom teacup


#1

I recently got a commission to create some pendants using pieces of
an heirloom teacup that broke. I have pretty much shaped the pieces
as I’d like them, but given the concavity of the inside surface, I
think it would be wise to back these pieces with something (somewhat
akin to a stunning piece of turquoise with a crappy, thin back to
it). Is there anything anyone can recommend that I can do myself
here in the studio? I didn’t charge a ton for these, as these people
don’t have a ton of money, but I could tell how much they wanted to
give these to their mom (the one the cup belonged to in the first
place). Otherwise I would take them to a lapidary and have them fixed
up. I appreciate any input anyone has!

Thanks!
Jennie


#2

Jennie,

Run a strip of tape around the perimeter of the teacup pieces and
fill them with epoxy. When it has cured file the epoxy flat and make
your bezels.

Steve Brixner
www.brixnerdesign.com


#3

Hi, Jennie.

Assuming you are building these pendants as a bezel cup - bezel
walls, sheet metal back: I would suggest first smoothing the back
edges around the perimeter of the pieces of china/porcelain, to
create a “flat” edge, sort of like a footing around the perimeter.
You should then be left with a concave center that can be supported
with packed sawdust, or perhaps some polymer clay. I’m not a polymer
person, but I would think that would work, too… The sawdust would
shift as needed to support the porcelain.

Best of luck! Sounds like an honorable, sweet project.

ginger

ginger meek allen


www.gingermeekallen.ganoksin.com


#4

Jennie, the way turquoise is (almost always) backed is simple- get
yourself some Devcon liquid steel (you can use brass or other, too).
On a flat benchtop lay down as much waxed paper as you need to spread
your pieces with a bit of space between. Mix the Devcon and spread it
out on the wax paper till it’s about 1/4 inch thick, and then put
your pieces on top of it, let it set overnight and break it up and
trim the edges. In the case of teacup parts, you may want to use a
spatula and fill the backs, first. And you may even just do that and
set them on the paper, without laying out a sheet of Devcon first.
All that depends on how much of a cavity you have. Since you’re not
going to cut the tops, like turquoise, you’ll need to be sure to keep
them clean. And you’ll want to push the pieces down so the backing
isn’t so thick, and also not so thin. Anyway, there are some various
methods, but we used to do 20 pounds of turquoise at a time like
that, it’s pretty much the standard way.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#5

Hi, Jennie,

I recently got a commission to create some pendants using pieces of
an heirloom teacup that broke. I have pretty much shaped the pieces
as I'd like them, but given the concavity of the inside surface, I
think it would be wise to back these pieces with something... 

You’re lucky! You have an opportunity to do something truly
astonishing and meaningful with these porcelain pieces, and for
clients who are already primed to be very happy with the outcome for
their mother’s sake – plus an extra layer of their gratitude because
you’ve rescued that wonderful teacup.

You might want to ask them if they’d like the double-pendant look,
with a second sentimental piece used as a backing. You could show
them photos in the book, “7000 Years of Jewellery”, from the British
Museum, as examples.

Lorraine