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Pattern resin for impressions


#1

After a long search with multiple emails to dental suppliers Darby
found an acryllic 2 part mix that I have successfully made perfect
impressions of 200 year old glass intaglios knows as tassies. It was
apparently a fad among the rich and creative to carve glass. It is
expensive $80 for 100 grams, but I’ll use only a small portion for
all of my 6-8 intaglios…It’s called Pattern Resin and the
worst thing about is that it stinks. I found brushing it on does not
work well with what I am doing. I fill the intaglio with resin
powder and then drip the liquid on it. It does not have to be
manipulated to work. It’s great stuff…

Regards, Jay


#2
After a long search with multiple emails to dental suppliers Darby
found an acryllic 2 part mix that I have successfully made perfect
impressions of 200 year old glass intaglios knows as tassies.

Is this the stuff?

http://www.darbydental.com/scripts/ProdPage.aspx?grp=8134185

And oh my, is that expensive.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#3

This is it. It is called Pattern Resin LS. It is by GC. However I
want to check on what you found.
http://www.gcamerica.com/lab/products/PATTERN_RESIN_LS/


#4

You can use another material called Duralay resin. I believe it
comes in a kit of 4 oz of liquid monomer and 4 oz of powder polymer
for less than $50. This gives a very accurate model of the surface it
is applied to. Be careful of undercuts because when it sets, in
removing the polymerized resin, you could fracture the original. It
would not hurt to lubricate the surface of the original with some
petroleum jelly: a very thin coat is all you need. The resin can be
mixed using a dropper to add the liquid to some powder drop by drop
and mixing until the consistency is like a very light yogurt and then
pouring this on the surface you want to capture. Alternatively you
could use a #3 sable brush, dip into the liquid (poured into a small
glass dish) and then carefully touch it to the powder picking up a
small ball shaped amount and then placing this on the surface to be
captured. This is just like the fingernail acrylic (the difference
is probably the particle size of the polymer, and it is designed to
be accurate and not shrink while setting). Do not let the acrylic set
in the brush, it will ruin it. Dip the brush into the monomer and
wipe it with a tissue. Then you can rinse the brush with acetone to
dry it. GC resin works the same way and is more expensive. The
cheaper acrylic resins may shrink more on setting.

Charles Friedman DDS
Ventura by the Sea