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Paste Solder (was efficient way)


#1

Dave–that is a handy idea. I have never used paste solder, nor
heard of anyone who did until it was mentioned in the earlier
post. What are its pitfalls? Why isn’t it used more frequently?
It sounds like it would be very handy when soldering findings
when the regular solder jumps around etc. Would really
appreciate a critique. Thanks, Sandra


#2

I use nothing else but solder paste best stuff ever invented.
Marty


#3
 that is a handy idea. I have never used paste solder, nor heard
of anyone who did until it was mentioned in the earlier post. 
What are its pitfalls? 

G’day, Sandra; pardon me for jumping in but thought you might
like another opinion. I’ve used it, but like Dave, went back to
the old fashioned method when I got about 20% failures in jump
rings and couldn’t be bothered to trust the stuff any more. I
found my best method is to hold the rings in a pair of spring
loaded, pointed-nose steel forceps, held with a self tapping
screw on an old jar lid which has been lead filled. I brush the
ring with flux, dip the very tip of a titanium pick in the flux
and shake off excess. The damp pick is touched to a paillon of
solder which sticks to it, and I heat the pick to make the solder
into a tiny ball then touch it to the heated jump ring - about 20
seconds. Still takes a long time to make a 450mm chain though!
By the way, I soak the completed chain in 10% sulphuric acid for
ten minutes or so, dry it thoroughly and putit in my home-made
vibrating polisher dry - and go out for a walk for an hour or so.
Works fine.

     It sounds like it (solder paste) would be very handy when
soldering findings when the regular solder jumps around etc.
Sandra

When soldering bezels, etc, I heat the fluxed work gently until
bubbling ceases, then put the solder paillons in place with the
flux-dampened pick; they don’t jump around then. Much! If they
do move you can push them back with the pick - if you’re fast
enough before they melt!

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)

#4
 What are its pitfalls?  Why isn't it used more frequently? It
sounds like it would be very handy when soldering findings when
the regular solder jumps around etc.

I’m not an expert on when & where to use paste solder. I only
know what works for me, however, I’m not adverse to trying new
techniques or products or old products for a new application.
Sometimes some of the new

techniques/products even work!

I got started using paste solder for soldering links together
for chain. It’s a pain in the butt, not to mention time
consuming, to cut solder sma ll enough for some of the links.
Paste solder is available in sterling, gold filled, various gold
karats & all the typical melting temps. I don’t know if the golds
are available in other than yellow. The solder (that I use) is
delivered in plastic syringes with 2 interchangable needles, a 16
& 20 ga. The golds are 1dwt & the sterlings 0.5 oz to the
syringes. The paste consists of a powdered solder, a flux &
transport vehicle which I believe is glycerine. The labels on
the golds indicate the flux may contain flourides & cadmium. The
sterling label states it contains flourides. The sterling is
about $7.00 if I remember correctly. A syringe lasts quite a
while.

To use, select the needle appropriate to the job, place the
needle tip close to the join to be soldered & squeeze the solder
from the syringe. The needle tip should be close enough to the
join so the solder can contact both sides (right & left) of the
join. The solder will adhere to the meta l. As with any
soldering, the join must be tight, paste solder is not a ‘gap
filler’. I don’t know if there’s a maximum time during which the
join must be soldered, but I’ve been interrupted & applied the
heat to the join a hour later with no problems. Usually I apply
the heat within 10 minutes if I’ve got a lot of joins to solder.

After soldering, the piece goes in the pickle; I use warm
Sparex, with no problems.

The idocyncrasies of paste solder are:

1.Syringe will leak if left uncapped (the vehicle oozes out).
2.Needles cake if not cleaned out before storage.
3.Paste is hard to eject if syringe is old.
4.Index & middle finger can get sore from syringe.
5.When applying paste, be sure to keep it where you want it; when
it reaches the liquidus point it melts almost instantaneously.
6.Putting the needle against something that is hot will cause the
paste t o cake in it.

There are simple solutions for each of the above.

1.Put the cap on.
2.Insert a wire of the appropriate size when finished with a
needle.
3.Warm the syringe under a warm, wet washcloth or a light bulb.
4.Use a solder aid to reduce the strain on the fingers & give
yourself more leverage.
5.Be careful when applying paste; remove any ‘oops’ before
applying heat.
6.Keep the needle away from hot metal or use the wire to clean it
out.
In all fairness, paste is not the solder of choice for all
applications. Sheet & wire solder are going to be around for a
long, long time. Paste i s great to use if the join is in an
awkward position & it’s hard to get pallions to stick. Paste is
self sticking.

Hope this helps.

Dave


#5

I gave up on traditional solders and have been using paste
exclusively with no downside effects uncovered to date. Used
properly, it will just as fine a job on sterling and karat gold
as the traditional ones.


#6

. I have never used paste solder, nor
heard of anyone who did until it was mentioned in the earlier
post. What are its pitfalls? Why isn’t it used more frequently

Sandra, I’ve been using paste solder probably since it first
came out. I mainly use it to repair hollow rope chains and
various other small chains. It is great nd light it on fire.
Immedietly after the flame goes out, touch the syringe to the
joint, and the paste will “melt” into the joint. Heat and solder
as usual. Good Luck! Wendy Newman