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[Orchid) Post Annealing


#1

how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring


#2

–> how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

You can work harden it afterwards by twisting the post. I learned
this during a previous discussion on orchid. More was said if you
want to search the archives.

Chunk Kiesling


#3
how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

Twist.

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND
http://www.adam.co.nz/eyewear/ eyeglasses
http://www.adam.co.nz/jewellery/ jewelry


#4
 how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring 

tricky. I try to almost cover the whole of the post with the
tweezers holding it. Also, try to heat the post at the last second
before you place it on the solder. I hold it above the solder
until the solder begins to puddle, then place it on the liquid
solder. I was making jewellry for 2 years before someone told me
that after you finish, you have to gently twist the post using
pliers to work harden it, after it is soldered. would have saved
me a lot of aggravation had I known that earlier. Anne


#5

how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

If you heat it you’ll anneal it. You can work harden it by
gripping the end of the post (in a collet preferably) and twisting
it. If you twist it back and forth, perhaps 360 degrees each way
from the original grip the post might not be marred at all.

DC


#6

You do anneal the post when you solder it on the earring. You
just have to work harden it afterward by burnishing or twisting the
post with pliers. Gini in warm, sunny Florida


#7
 how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

Everyone has mentioned twisting to harden the post up, but on
occasion, the earring may be too delicate, or constructed in a way
that makes twisting a problem. I’ve found that burnishing it
against a steel block will work too. Use lots of pressure to really
harden it up.

Karen
(the one in Boulder, CO)


#8
   how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

Get yourself a pair of crosslocks with thick tips. Heat up the
ends and bend them both at a 90 degree angle. Use a ball bur to cut
a channel in the tips so that when a post is inserted it will fit
tight and only 2-3mm sticks out of the bottom. You should be able
to push the post up to the end of the channel and have a firm stop
so that the same amount of post sticks out on the end every time.
Melt the solder into a ball and pick it up with the post. Don’t let
the solder melt onto the post, just pick up the ball on the end.
Heat the piece up to soldering temp and place the post where you
want it and melt the solder onto the post and the piece at the same
time. The crosslocks act as a heat sink and also increase your
accuracy and speed as it makes it easier to get the post on
perpendicular on the first try. Hope this makes sense, it’s easier
done than said!

Brett


#9
  You can work harden it afterwards by twisting the post. I
learned this during a previous discussion on orchid. More was
said if you want to search the archives.

I just read that twisting is used on CAST pieces . . .since I do
not cast, I do not recommend twisting . . . it usually breaks off
the post at the point of solder.


#10
 how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

That’s always a problem… My best solution is to run the
earring overnight in my polisher. (it is a light weight vibrator
and I use 80% porceline beads and 20% mixed shot. This burnished
and hardens the wire.


#11
   how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

The easiest way is to use a ‘Sparkie’ (it’s a fusion welder made
for the job) to mount the posts. However, many small shops don’t
have that kind of equipment, it’s kind of expensive unless you do a
large volumn of earrings. If you solder posts on, keep the heat
away from the post as much as possible. Then when the solder job is
complete pull & flex the post with a plier. An alternate way is to
grasp the pin between the notch and end wit h a pin vise & twist a
couple of turns. Try the twist routine on a an soldered post or
piece of wire held in a vise to get a feel for it. No ne ed in
twisting off the ends off a posts that are already soldered on.

Dave


#12

This’d work! Nice idea for holding the post. Similar to what I do

  • bring the post in at the right moment after the piece has reached
    temperature. I have a shallow hole I aim for. Makes it a little
    harder, but the join’s better.

I thought of balling the end of the post and flattening it for a
better join. Anneals the post, though.

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND


#13

The sparkie is a wonderful tool for fusing findings to all types
of jewelry items- including titanium and niobium items that defy
soldering and welding. Royal Findings, the sister company to Triad,
the people who make the sparkie fusion welder make all sorts of
findings in a variety of alloys and non-precious metals. This past
week I repaired an earring with a 18k french wire by fusing a new
wire- the earring had a bezel set sunstone less than 5mm from the
wire. The unit generates no heat. It is the best way to put
findings on enameled pieces.

Rick Hamilton

Richard D. Hamilton
A goldsmith on Martha’s Vineyard
USA
Fabricated 14k, 18k, 22k, and platinum Jewelry
wax carving, modelmaking, jewelry photography,
and sailing whenever I can…
http://www.rick-hamilton.com


#14
       how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an
earring

I know some of you are going to poo-poo this, but it works for me
for sterling posts (I usually don’t have any problem with gold). I
use “tix” flux and solder. It comes in wire form and I hammer it
flat and cut it into small snippets and using very little heat
(important!!) solder it to the earring. Make sure to hold the post
very still until the solder sets up (about 5 seconds) or else the
joint will be weak. I havn’t had any more problems with this
method (I’ve been using it on my production earrings for about 7
years) than I’ve had with “twisted” sterling posts breaking off.
Another advantage, worst case if you have a repair, you don’t need
to remove the stone from the mounting (most cases). Your pickle
will not tolerate tix solder.

Wendy Newman
ggraphix@msn.com


#15

Post Annealing,

The way I do it has some similarities with what Brian Adams wrote.
Putting the post at the earring when the earring is on
temperature. But before that, I let the solder flow at the earring
(in an eventually made small hole) and then come in with the post
(dipped in the flux) wich has to be heated then only for a very
short moment.

Judith de Vries

Visit my Homepage:


#16
   how do you not anneal a post when you solder it on an earring

I wonder if we do really need to work-harden the post? Over the
life of the earstud the post’ll get bent and wiggled - wouldn’t it
make sense to have that post start out annealed, so it’ll last
longer til it reaches an over-worked state and snaps?

I propose selective work-hardening - twist the part near the base
only, and allow the main part of the post to be like the willow…

Brian
B r i a n � A d a m J e w e l l e r y E y e w e a r �
@Brian_Adam1 ph/fx +64 9 817 6816 NEW ZEALAND


#17
I wonder if we do really need to work-harden the post?

I’m with you Brian, I never work-harden posts, they harden even in
the mild wear and tear of showing the earrings to customers. Lisa
(its stopped raining!) in Topanga,CA


#18

Brian- I found that if I don’t anneal the entire post it tends to
find all sorts of odd directions after I card it and pack and
unpack it for shows. I guess if you travel with your work to
shows you must have a better storage system than me.

Janet- feeling summer’s heat in Spring and loving it!
Phila, USA