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#1

Hi gang

I just finished two more rings for my Resume’ tray, some explanation
here is needed.

The Straight-Baguettes in the ring of 5 stones were actually
Cushion-cut.

But you can see how Bright-Cutting (with a #40 Flat graver) just
enhances & finishes the setting process. No Triangular file, just a
nice. smooth…Bright-Cutting surface.

The two Baguette shoulder-stones were both 1mm. too long for the
ring, but I persevered!..again, Bright-cutting. just as in the
previous photograph.

Now when the polishing is done… WOW!!! My ring polishing is to
only ‘touch-up’ any sharp corners, not to smooth the channel-wall or
bezel down.

For my next ‘sample’ is a relatively difficult setting procedure.
It’s call “Fish-Tail”. This whole procedure will be featured in a DVD
that Hanuman is putting together for ‘us’. It is a 1.5 hour long
explanation how this technique is done. difficulty scale of 25/10.

All I use are two gravers, one for Rough-Cutting & the other is for
Bright-Cutting. The graver names are Onglette #1 & #2) Hoping you all
appreciate my labours. regards to everyone!



Gerry


#2

Not bad Gerry we are all still learning!


#3

Final Resume’ photo’s

Now you can see the reasons why I promote Bright-Cutting on all
Diamond Setting that I do. As all of our rings, etc are a visual
thing. the final Bright-Cuts make any ring more saleable.







Gerry


#4

So impressively daunting! But exciting, I’m sure, to be the student
learning these from you. Beautiful work, as always, Gerry.

Cheers,
Becky


#5
Now you can see the reasons why I promote Bright-Cutting on all
Diamond Setting that I do. As all of our rings, etc are a visual
thing. the final Bright-Cuts make any ring more saleable. 

Gerry, I sure hope all those photos are of student work, expected to
get better with practice. While they’re all bright cut, which is
good, not one of them is really straight/symetrical. The bright cut
on the round stone isn’t a circle.

The corners on the emerald cut are especially crooked and messy…,
square corners aren’t square to the stone, bezels aren’t quite
symetrical, etc.

Sure you want students to be using those photos? Seems to me that
once they’ve got the skills of sharpening and using the gravers, as
they most obviously now do, you could have them take a closer look
before taking the photo to make sure corners are square, circles are
round, lines don’t wobble. They’ve got things almost there. A few
more minutes looking closely, and evening things up before calling it
done, could go a long ways…

Or maybe I’m just being way too fussy…

Peter Rowe


#6

Peter Rowe

I just want to show you see ‘my’ Bright-Cutting. Hoping these two
simple photographs meets your approval!!

The rectangle plate is called “Pre-Cutting”, as the stone is the
last thing to be worked on. All *Onglette-cutting *is done prior to
any form of setting, then no graver will be sliding over the girdles
of the multitude of stones. No faceting of cutting after the
diamond is in the metal.

The next picture is of an “Art Deco-design” & is called
"Cut-Down", apparently not too many setters have used this form of
setting. All of this is done with only two gravers, a Flat & Onglette
#2. In fact Salvidor Dali used this form in one of his fantastic
patterns called “The Eye of Time”.

(It is located just inside the little tear drop), you can Google the
picture yourself! *Peter, if you have any form of grievances or other
remarks. please write to me ‘off-line’…*thanks!!!..*Gerry *



#7
http://www.ganoksin.com/ftp/glArteDecocutting.jpg
http://www.ganoksin.com/ftp/glArteDecocutting.jpg 

Gerry, part of the problem may lie in the photography. I really
appreciate your generosity in sharing process and But my
experience and understanding of your work would benefit greatly by
seeing better images.

Take care,
Andy


#8
I just want to show you see '*my*' Bright-Cutting. Hoping these
two simple photographs meets your approval!! 

They do. Nice examples of these styles. I’ve seen a considerable
resurgence the last few years of the “Precut” type of work. I suspect
that it goes hand in hand with the rising popularity of the
"micropave" style. The latter is, to my mind, not really classic pave
work at all, since typically the stones are supported only at the
prongs, not around the girdle, since that portion of the metal is
usually cut away before the stones are put in place, leaving less
metal in contact with the stones. Well done, it’s beautiful. Your
precut example is not micropave, but an equally usful variation on
traditional methods, especially useful in it’s tendancy to not
generate problems with shreds of extra metal arround or between beads
that then need to be cleaned up. Thanks for showing that example. The
cut-down style is, as you note, not seen often in modern work.

I’ve found it most often, actually, on work that predates art deco
styles, often late 1800s, before the introduction of white golds,
when it was common for diaonds to be set in a silver layer put on top
of the otherwise gold pieces. It’s a pretty style when well done, and
your photo shows a well done example.

thanks.
Peter Rowe