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Mineral ID help


#1

Hello all.

Are there any rock hounds out there that can help? I have an unsolved mystery mineral I don’t know what it is. Any ideas?

It was found at the bottom of an Obsidian dome crater amoungst granite and obsidian in Eastern Sierras, California. It has a long needlike white fan structure coming out of a very dull grey lead like feeling rock.


#2

Looks like asbestos.


#3

I think it’s an angel’s wing.


#4

I hope it’s not a fallen angel


#5

chrysotile asbestos

At 03:49 AM 7/5/2017, you wrote:

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https://orchid.ganoksin.com/u/hearnerhearner
July 5

Hello all.

Are there any rock hounds out there that can help? I have an
unsolved mystery mineral I don’t know what it is. Any ideas?

It was found at the bottom of an Obsidian dome crater amoungst
granite and obsidian in Eastern Sierras, California. It has a long
needlike white fan structure coming out of a very dull grey lead
like feeling rock.


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#6

I used to work in a jewellery-factory back in 1970’s. Guess what the head-repairman used to cover the rings that had genuine stones… yup! You’re right, moist Asbestos!!
This prevented the intense heat being drawn up to the stones during sizing. He used to have loads of this (***) ready to be used again, some of it was dry!!..;( Lets’s see now, he was a chain-smoker and he inhaled this stuff…yuk!

Gerry! from my mobile-phone!


#7

There is a lot of asbestos in the area you describe, and I would suggest that asbestos is what it is. If so, be careful how you handle and display it - those fibers (and smaller ones that you can’t see) are carcinogens and will scar your lungs if inhaled.


#8

When I started at the bench in the early 80s we still used powdered asbestos, not only as a heat shield but also just to hold small parts in place during soldering. As long as you keep it wet and in a covered jar you’re fine. You just have to be careful removing the dried asbestos from the soldered piece. Best to do it under water.
Francesco, the master jeweler who was training me, said to me once, while holding up his little jar, “This. This is the cancer.” He retired back to Italy, so I don’t know if he developed lung issues or not.


#9

Hi, Rachel,

Even if it turns out not to be asbestos, all of the fibrous minerals in that dry, flaky state are a risk to lung health if inhaled. If you’ll be keeping it as a specimen, it will be at its loveliest in a sealed jar.

best,

Lorraine


#10

Wow thanks everyone it does seems as though I found a very interesting little lump of carcinogen! I hadn’t ever imagined it would be asbestos. I hadn’t even realised asbestos was something you’d find out in nature I always presumed it was like fibreglass and made made.

I’ve really enjoyed hearing about it’s previous uses in the jewellery trade. I knew of it’s use in soldering mats but had no idea it was used in other ways.

I’m a bit disappointed I didn’t keep it now. I didn’t think I’d be able to transport it without damaging it so I left it.

Thanks again everyone.


#11

Does look a lot like asbestos I just found at this site: https://www.mindat.org/gm/383.

Esta Jo