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Microscope Help


#1

For over a year now, I have been looking for a high quality,
reasonable priced binocular microscope for my gem studies. The scopes
that GIA sells are high quality, but also very high priced. However,
not knowing the quality and reputation of the other manufactures, I
fear making a purchase of this size blindly.

Kassoy recently started selling a line of reasonably priced ones by
Accu-Scope. I found the web site for this manufacturer and they seem
to have a large and impressive selection. Is anyone familiar with the
Accu-Scope model or heard anything about them?

I would appreciate any comments or advice concerning this brand or
any other. Thank you.

Kassoy at: http://www.kassoy.com/scopes02.html
Accu-Scope at: http://www.accu-scope.com/
Charles Heick


#2
    For over a year now, I have been looking for a high quality,
reasonable priced binocular microscope for my gem studies.  

Sorry I can’t help with microscope choice; mine’s a monocular Olympus
I bought from the local University where I worked (perfect condition;
NZ$35!) and quite satisfactory. For gem studies you shouldn’t need
an objective greater than 40 X (mine has four objectives up to 1000 X

  • I used it for bacteriological work) But one thing you might like to
    think of when you buy the 'scope, is to get an eyepiece micrometer.
    This is simply a little glass disc with measurements in micro metres
    etched into it - doesn’t cost very much. You just unscrew the top
    lens of the eyepiece, insert the disc, and screw the lens back in
    place. Then when you look at anything you can see the markings
    faintly superimposed over the object and you thus may take very
    accurate measurements of whatever you want. Happy microscopy, Cheers,
    John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ

#3
    For over a year now, I have been looking for a high quality,
reasonable priced binocular microscope for my gem studies.  

Sorry I can’t help with microscope choice; mine’s a monocular Olympus
I bought from the local University where I worked (perfect condition;
NZ$35!) and quite satisfactory. For gem studies you shouldn’t need an
objective greater than 40 X (mine has four objectives up to 1000 X -
I used it for bacteriological work) But one thing you might like to
think of when you buy the 'scope, is to get an eyepiece micrometer.
This is simply a little glass disc with measurements in micro metres
etched into it - doesn’t cost very much. You just unscrew the top
lens of the eyepiece, insert the disc, and screw the lens back in
place. Then when you look at anything you can see the markings
faintly superimposed over the object and you thus may take very
accurate measurements of whatever you want. Happy microscopy,
Cheers, –

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#4

Charles,

I don’t know about the microscopes you are looking at but I want to
relate to you my experience with the GIA product that I own. About
22 years ago, I bought a Gemolite Mark V from the GIA. It was a huge
amount of money for me at the time (I think I paid about $1600 for it
and it took me about a year to pay off on my credit card.) I was
working out of my apartment, doing craft shows and barely making a
living. I still have and use that microscope today. In this entire
time period the only repairs I have ever had to make to the microscope
is putting in new light bulbs and buying two new covers for the
fluorescent light fixture. (I have actually had to get new tweezers,
too, but that was my fault not the microscopes.) Eighteen years ago
we opened our store and not a day has gone by since that we have not
used that microscope. I still use it to show my customers their
diamonds. My staff uses it to grade stones and check their work
under it every single day. I know that GIA’s scopes cost in the $5000
range now but I would absolutely not recommend that you buy a product
like this based on the cost. Buy a product that is going to last a
lifetime.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Spirer Somes Jewelers
1794 Massachusetts Ave
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-491-6000
@spirersomes
www.spirersomes.com


#5

Hi Charles,

This may interest you. I have a Ernest Leitz/Wetzer (Germany
Nr.449617) monocular microscope available. It is fitted with the
complete specimen illumination apparatus source. Movable rotating
lenses 5x/0.09, 10x/0.18, 20x/0.35, 50x/0.85. Its cabinet is solid
wood with handle. Condition mint. Used in the geological department of
a mining company in South Africa. Net shipping mass is 8.8kg. Any
reasonable offer will be considered. Purchaser to pay shipping costs.

Should you be interested my email is twain@mweb.co.za

Regards,
Ed.


#6

I have several very good 10x-30x and 20x-40x stereo microscopes
available for $199 each. Brand new and an exceptional value. if
interested please contact me at @Mike_Little for photos and
specs. Thanks.


#7

I want to thank all those who responded to my inquiry on microscopes.
All of you have been most helpful. Daniel Spirer made a good point
on quality with his Gemolite Mark V. It’s now known as the Mark X and
is made by Leica for GIA.

GIA’s GemoLite Super 60 Zoom Mark X now sells for around $3600.
Kassoy also sells the Leica models and the one with the same
appearance and specifications as GIA’s Super 60 sells for around
$2900. It’s called the Leica Stereo Zoom 60 and is approved by the
Gemological Association of Great Britain. For now, I feel that is the
best buy for me in terms of quality and value.

I’m not hurrying out and buying it right now. I’m going to take a
couple of months to consider my choice. So all those returning from
Tucson and have something to add, please do so. Nothing is definite
yet and it’s never too late to add your thoughts. I would appreciate
any comments or help.

Thanks again.
Charles Heick


#8

If you are looiking for microscopes - you should consider a gem lab-
Jeff Wildman builds wonderful equipment and his porducts are more
reasonable than GIA- he has Gem Instruments in Sun River Oregon