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Meco Midget


#1

Orchid friends-- I’m feeling a bit incompetent right now-- I spent a
long and weary afternoon at the computer, trying to figure out where
I should buy a Meco Midget torch, to no avail. Help! Any suggestions?
The suppliers whose catalogs I have don’t seem to sell it. Thanks!
–Noel, frustrated after a lot of time better spent in the studio


#2

FDJTools.com http://www.fdjtool.com/index.html sells the Meco
Midget (use their search feature), although it looks good, for me
I’ll still probably go for the Hoke torch, works better with my
wrist…

Good searching,
Ed


#3

Hello Noel, If $105 sounds like a good price, here is the link to
where you can get it:

https://www.tinmantech.com/html/meco_midget_torch.html

It comes with 1 tip, so you will need to order extra tips. Also,
check out the fish tip holder and wrench…kindof a cool thing.

Otherwise you can find it at Frei & Borel I’m pretty sure. Kent’s
Tools in Tucson can get it for you (be sure to go to his tent when at
the Gem Show!). There is also TGW in Canada and Lacy West in
Canada…but they have higher prices. All can be found probably with
a Google search.

Hope this helps!


#4

Hi Noel. I’ve been researching an oxygen / propane set up for
myself. This is what I’ve found: Catalog numbers and prices are for
oxygen / propane handpiece and tips.

Gesswein  (203 366-5400)
gessweinco@aol.com
#830-0670  $109.86 
(my 1996-97 catalog has probably been updated)

Frei and Borel  (800 772-3456) 	#114.160  $95.00 	 	Stuller  (800

877-7777) #14-1600 $112.00 For other components you might need,
check where you purchase your fuel. I found that I can get gauges,
hoses and tanks reasonably through my local welding supply. I asked
at what price they could provide the whole setup and was told they
didn’t have the handpiece and tips I wanted but were more than
willing to quote a break on the retail for the other components I
would be purchasing. Their regular retail prices are better than the
catalog prices I’ve found and there’s no shipping. They will cut
hoses to your preferred length and attach the needed fittings. My
replacement hoses have always been less than a catalog item.

This is my birthday month. As a present to myself, I have made a
contribution to Orchid (via PayPal) so that I can help assure we
continue to benefit from this special community. Thanks to all who
share so freely and to Hanuman for making it all possible!
Disclaimer: :slight_smile: I receive no (direct) financial benefit from Orchid
but am a very satisfied participant. The benefits I do receive are
many and some may affect my bottom line. As always, your mileage may
vary.

HTH
Pam Chott


#5
    Orchid friends-- I'm feeling a bit incompetent right now-- I
spent a long and weary afternoon at the computer, trying to figure
out where I should buy a Meco Midget torch, to no avail. Help! Any
suggestions? The suppliers whose catalogs I have don't seem to sell
it. Thanks! --Noel, frustrated after a lot of time better spent in
the studio 

GO TO: http://welding-torch.com/html/meco_midget_torch.html

Meco was in St Loius -got urban renewed out of their Charles Dckens
era building into a newer place years ago Then purchased mostly
out of existence by Victor. I found who kept the midget alive a
while back – posted it once-- now who was that???.

But you should be able to get one here.

Jesse


#6

I got mine via Swest in '97. Their number is 1-800-527-5057.

Good luck! Elizabeth
www.borntobeworn.com


#7

Noel, Frei and Borel carries the Meco Midget. They are in Oakland,
CA. Phone # 800-772-3456. Ask for both a tool catalogue and a
findings catalogue. Lots of useful stuff. If I spent as much time
making jewelry as I do reading catalogues I might even be making
money.

Betty


#8

Hi Noel! I bought one a couple years ago… I believe it was from
Gesswein. If I ever get my natural gas connected in the studio I’ll
have an opportunity to use it!

All the best,
Dave
Dave Sebaste


#9
    FDJTools.com  http://www.fdjtool.com/index.html  sells the
Meco Midget (use their search feature), although it looks good, for
me I'll still probably go for the Hoke torch, works better with my
wrist... 

I got a deal on my Meco from a friend, used. But the Hoke is an
excellent choice. I still use one for heavy silver articles and
platinum work (although hydrogen would be better for plat.). Nice
thing about the Hoke, you can get all kinds of tips for it. I used
to build elaborate settings with it, rings with 150+ solder joints in
them we used to call “balerina” mountings. Center stone with
undulating baguettes around the perimeter like a balerina’s tutu.
The Hoke is a bit bulkier than the Meco, and now I primarily use a
Mini torch. If you get the Meco, get some extra tips. You can drill
the ends out to fit short pieces of tubing with various inside
diamters to make smaller or larger flames. Just drill out the end
to accept 1/4 inch or so of tubing and silver solder it in place. By
the way, anybody tried that “Swiss Torch” that Frei & Borel sells?
Looks really cool! I may get one some day if I set up any more
benches in my shop (2 at present). Personally, I want to get my hands
on one of those gasoline torches with the pump bellows that are still
used in parts of Asia. Just the anachronistic bent in me.

David L. Huffman


#10
  If you get the Meco, get some extra tips. You can drill the ends
out to fit short pieces of tubing with various inside diamters to
make smaller or larger flames. Just drill out the end to accept 1/4
inch or so of tubing and silver solder it in place 

David-- Why do you need the tubing, instead of just a hole in
the tip, drilled out to the size you want? Does it matter what metal
tubing?

–Noel


#11
    David--     Why do you need the tubing, instead of just a hole
in the tip, drilled out to the size you want? Does it matter what
metal tubing? 

Hi Noel;

Things may have changed since I bought mine nearly 20 years ago, but
back then, there were only two sizes of tips available. The largest
tip was pretty big, but not quite big enough for a heavy silver
piece. The smaller one was great for most jewelry work, until you
needed to do some really tight soldering, then it was too large. I
used brass tubing to make a smaller orifice in the smallest available
tip, and I’ve drilled out one of the bigger ones to make a larger
orifice. Get 2 of each, drill out one of the large tips, put a tube
in one of the small tips, and then you have 4 different sizes. I
prefer brass tubing because the tips are brass, and the coefficient
of expansion would then be uniform, but that’s probably not critical
in such a small article. Another advantage of the brass insert is
that it gives you a little extra length to the tip, which makes for
a better feel. You can come up to the piece being soldered without
having to bend your wrist as much and subsequently the hoses hang
down straighter, instead of having to be lifted at an angle to come
in with the flame.

David L. Huffman