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Magnification when setting tiny stones


#1

Hi there everyone! Guys Im looking forward for your fantastic pieces
of advice.

When setting tiny stones, what is the appropriate magnification,
like would a pair of these 3.5X dental telescopes ($30 off ebay) be
sufficient, or do i need something stronger (the stronger - the more
expensive. Interestingly, 4X is already over a $120).

Thanks a million.


#2

Look at an Optivisor, I like the #7 lenses myself. I would guess
it’s the most widely used magnifier in the jewelry biz.

Mark


#3

I paid around $1200 for my Mieji and a buck fitty more for some 20X
eyepieces…


#4
When setting tiny stones, what is the appropriate magnification,
like would a pair of these 3.5X dental telescopes ($30 off ebay)
be sufficient, or do i need something stronger (the stronger - the
more expensive. Interestingly, 4X is already over a $120). 

Well many stone setters are using stereo zoom microscopes with at
least 10x. Many use just an optivisor. I would stay away from the
crappy “dental” binocular loupes on ebay. I have a set of Zeiss 4x
loupes that are wonderful but they are very expensive. I wanted to
get a pair for an employee and I thought I would see if the ebay
loupes were any good. The frame broke within a week and the optics
are somewhat fuzzy, I was not impressed.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#5

Once I sat down on a whim at a show and tried the Meiji microscope I
realized how much I had not been seeing before! Today I do no setting
without the Meiji, although in truth I could do all but the finest
detail without it, but… the quality of the work I do under the
microscope is simply much better than what I can do under the loop as
I was originally trained.

Partially this is due to my aging eyes, and partially it is that any
eyes are going to see a lot better under a microscope.

The Meiji and the Acrobat stand it is mounted on are as much a part
of my bench now as the flex shaft, the saw and the torch. (and the
laser)


#6
Today I do no setting without the Meiji, although in truth I could
do all but the finest detail without it, but..... the quality of
the work I do under the microscope is simply much better than what
I can do under the loop as I was originally trained. 

I feel the same as James.

I am very dependent on my Meiji. I use it with setting, hand
engraving, wax carving…any fine detail work. I would add that good
lighting is as important as magnification. If you can see it better
than you customer can, your work will always look good.

Mark