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Magnetic spheres et al


#1

G’day Karen and those of you who haven’t arranged for the
prolific Burgess mails to be trashed on reception. I don’t know
much detail about magnetic alloys. This is what I do know: Many
so-called stainless alloys actually contain a little iron, and
they are magnetic. Most stainless ‘steels’ do contain nickel, and
I do know that pure nickel is magnetic. So are alloys containing
manganese. I also know that if any magnetically-susceptible
metals are hammered, dropped or treated violently in the presence
of a magnetic field - including the natural one this planet
posesses - that metal will itself become magnetised. I’ve
demonstrated this many times. Thus, carbon steel balls will
doubtless become magnetised via the Earth’s field in a tumbler
or vibrator. I also know that there are many materials that are
very powerful magnets that contain no iron whatever - the
familiar Alnico (ALuminium, Nickel CObalt) was one of the best
but is now vastly superceded by far more powerful ceramic
magnets that contain no actual metal at all. Ain’t science
wonderful? By the way, I don’t like the word ‘shot’ applied to
the spheres we’re talking about; shot is usually made of lead -
and we have to keep lead and lead alloys far, far away from any
precious metals - or else! I can’t go on about martensitic
alloys because I don’t know enough about them. So that will
have to do. Cheers, –

    /\
   / /    John Burgess,(Taure Excretum Cerebrum Obsidet)
  / /
 / //\    @John_Burgess2
/ / \ \

/ (___)
(_________)


#2

Hi John, I’ve known about various stainless steel because of
SCUBA diving. Dive knives (at least those which end up in salt
water- ocean) end up with a lot of rust on them, yet if you read
the imprint on them, they all say that they are 100% stainless
steel! Some are better than others, and it’s not the price which
determines the quality.

Thank you for enlightening others of the magnetic facts!


#3

John,

How would u slow down a mag field but keep it strong enough to
turn a mag item and therefore turn the soltion used inthe mag
tumblers…

THese things can’t be that expensive or difficult to build!

Jim


#4

Jim,

How would u slow down a mag field but keep it strong enough to
turn a mag item and therefore turn the soltion used inthe mag
tumblers.... <<

The magnets are mounted to a plate attached to the shat of a
variable speed motor. Just varying the motor speed controls how
fast the mixture in the barrel moves.

You’re right, it shouldn’t be too hard to build one, if you can
find the right magnets.

Dave =


#5

J> How would u slow down a mag field but keep it strong enough to
J> turn a mag item and therefore turn the soltion used inthe mag
J> tumblers…

G’day: I have never seen a magnetic polisher with no moving
parts (other than the polishing medium of course) All I can
think of is to get the most powerful ceramic magnet you can find
and epoxy it to the shaft of a variable speed motor, like a
sewing machine motor. Use plastic (non-metal anyway) to contain
the spheres and arrange things so that it is as close to the
rotating magnet as possible without interfering with the
rotation. The magnetic field will penetrate aluminium, but some
power would be lost as the metal converts the moving field to
electric currents. There you are; NZ$0.01 worth. (multiply by
1.552 to get US equivalent!) Cheers, –

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)