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[Looking4] Polishing Motor or Cabinet


#1

Hi Everyone,

I have a polishing motor that is on its way out. I either need a new
1/3 horsepower motor double spindle (18" wide) to use with the table
top dust collecting cabinet that I already have, which is 20.5" wide,
OR I need a table top dust collecting cabinet to fit another double
spindle motor that I have in storage that is 21" wide, so the cabinet
would have to be at least 24" wide. If any of you have a used one
that you no longer need, name your price and send me info offline

Thanks!

Sitting in my studio wishing smoke wasn’t emitting from my polisher.

Tavia
Tavia K.F. Brown
www.taviametal.com


#2

Just cut the shaft of the spare motor to the length of the bad
motor. The shafts are made long to accommodate different
applications. Just trim to suit.

Harold


#3

Very often you can find a local company that will repair and or
rewind the existing motor for less than the cost of a new one.

The only thing is to mention the use of the motor to the repair
people if the motor tag is unreadable. Many polishers operate at
3470 RPM and if you got back the motor rewound to 1725 (Which is
standard for most fractional horsepower motors in north America) you
would not be a happy person

Kay


#4
Sitting in my studio wishing smoke wasn't emitting from my
polisher. 

Tavia, is it possible to take your polishing motor apart and clean
out any polishing residue inside? I did this when my cheap Buffalo
bench grinder started not working. I’m not sure it was meant to be
taken apart, but I did anyway, and after I cleaned it out, it’s been
good for another ten years of light use (tumble-polishing is so much
easier and cleaner!).

Judy Bjorkman


#5

follow up on post by Harold to cut the shaft.

You may not need to cut the shaft if the taper shaft adapter can
accommodate the extra length Remove and try the adapter spindles on
your motor and also make sure if the shaft size (dia) on both the
motor are the same.(In some cases the motor body is longer and the
shaft sizes are the same then you cannot use the motor) The
replacement motors are not very expensive check you local supply
store. The dust collector manufacturers buy these motors in 1000’s
(thousands). They are wired with short cable etc and they have the
good quality name brand motors.

A decent dust collector with 2 spindles sells for 250 to 300 dollars
and a spare motor costs close to $100 You may be able to pick up a
replacement from Grainger (best dealers in the motor business) for
$60 to 70. Rewinding is not a very good alternative specially for the
dust collector motor as you can find replacement easily.

Kenneth Singh


#6

Tavia,

I have a polishing motor that is on its way out. I either need a
new 1/3 horsepower motor double spindle (18" wide) to use with the
table top dust collecting cabinet that I already have, which is
20.5" wide, OR I need a table top dust collecting cabinet to fit
another double spindle motor that I have in storage that is 21"
wide, so the cabinet would have to be at least 24" wide.

I have had the same thing happen to me a few years ago and I
replaced it with a 1/2 HP grinder from Harbor Freight that I got on
sale for around $25. You take off all the guards and grinding wheels.
The shafts are threaded but they work the same with the tapered
spindles or maybe you will want to replace the spindles with the
threaded type. If you are going with your old spindles you will also
want to grind a flat spot on the shaft so the set screws on the
tapered shafts have something to lock on to and screw down flush on
the tapered spindle. I didn’t do this at first and was constantly
nicking my knuckles on the exposed set screws. It only took a couple
years and many Band-Aids to get around to it but I eventually
got-r-done. The Harbor Freight grinder replacement has been working
for years.

Most of the lower end polishing motors are the vented type and all
the fluff from the buffing mops gets inside the motor and causes
problems.

Rick Copeland
Silversmith and Lapidary Artisan
rockymountainwonders.com