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Little Torch


#1

I have recently purchased a propane/oxygen Little Torch. My
question concerns eye safety. Should one wear the same
welding-type glasses used during casting? Although the size of
the flame is significantly smaller with the Little Torch, I feel
that the intensity of the flame may be equivalent to that of a
full size gas/oxygen torch. Thanks.


#2

I too use the little torch. Just about 4 months ago I went in
for an eye exam and my Optometrist was surprised to see that I
now (since he saw me a year before) had some scar tissue on my
retina’s. He attributed this to the intense blue flame of my
little torch. It seems that it gives off UltraViolet rays, from
both ends of the spectrum. (A and B ) UV’s are what give us
suntans/burns and also cause cataracts. I have a pair of
"Transitions" type lens/safety glasses that were very costly at
the time, and had not been wearing them. I do now. What he said
makes sense to me, and I figure he was telling the truth,
especially since he didn’t try to sell me anything more, just
"encouraged" (Scared the bejeebers out of me) me to wear my
glasses, even when I’m not “shafting/buffing”

Tim


#3

Tim Before you think you are out of the woods, get your lenses
tested. In a recent news story out of New York, many people who
had ordered UV protection on their lenses, didn’t get it. I
don’t know how one would test for this.

Steve Ramsdell


#4

Tim, I wear graduated bi-focals, which have the UV coating, but
alas, I am unable to wear these while doing soldering, sawing or
anything else related to jewelry making. I don’t think that any
of the ‘reading glasses’ which are on the market are helpful
against ultra-violet rays.

BTW, I mentioned to the optometrist that I needed glasses for
"close up" work and told him that I worked with metal but he
never suggested anything other than the reading glasses. I also
wonder . . . the jeweler optic thingies that are found in
nearly every catalog, would those have any sort of UV coating???
I think not. I’m also wondering if the flame from prestolite
would be as intense as that from the Little Torch. Would the
orange colored glasses that are used by glass bead makers be
beneficial?

Thanks for any opinions or suggestions.


#5

hi- Wales apparatus, in Pennsylvania, has clip-ons for UV rays,
and IR (whatever that is-) . Although they are designed for glass
workers using oxy/propane, I don’t see why they wouldn’t be fine
for casting. Their number is 800-334-WALE- anne


#6

Tim, I wear graduated bi-focals, which have the UV coating, but
alas, I am unable to wear these while doing soldering, sawing or
anything else related to jewelry making. I don’t think that any
of the ‘reading glasses’ which are on the market are helpful
against ultra-violet rays.

There is a plastic bifocal lens on the market now available in
most magnifications that can be easy applied to any glasses. It
works by wetting the lens and glasses and sticking them to each
other by surface tension much the same as you oil change sticker.
I have been using them in my regular safety glasses for nearly a
year now and love them.

They can be ordered online by contacting. Neoptics
www.neoptx.com The lens can be easily removed and placed in other
glasses.

Don Fogg
@Don_Fogg
http://www.dfoggknives.com


#7

Fishbre, if that?s your real name, :>)

The presto-lite torch doesn?t use oxygen and is not nearly as
bright. I think that is an important factor.

Marilyn Smith


#8
   I too use the little torch. Just about 4 months ago I went in
for an eye exam and my Optometrist was surprised to see that I
now (since he saw me a year before) had some scar tissue on my
retina's. He attributed this to the intense blue flame of my
little torch. 

hi tim,

i was wondering, what type of gas do you use? also a question to
everyone in general: acetylene burns much brighter than propane,
hydrogen, butane and natural gas. i wonder if it emits more eye
debilitating rays than the other gases?

best regards,

geo fox


#9

I just use plain old Oxy-propane. I actually haven’t used any
acetlyene in 5-6 years, and then I was wearing a pair #5 welding
goggles. Am I weak?

Tim


#10
I just use plain old Oxy-propane. I actually haven't used any
acetlyene in 5-6 years, and then I was wearing a pair #5 welding
goggles. Am I weak?

I would have thought so until today! I finally got my Little
Torch hooked up with an adequate supply of propane, and what a
difference! I have liked using it before, but now I’ll have to
learn all over again. Having read this discussion, I was more
aware when I lit the torch on the new propane supply today, and
that little blue cone is BRIGHT! I have a friend who did a bit of
research a year or so ago on UV and infra-red emissions from coal
fires in blacksmith’s forges compared to that in standard welding
situations. He is a research scientist for Schering-Plough
researching sunlight and human physiology, and is a pretty good
blacksmith on his own time, so this was a matter of both personal
and scientific curiosity for him. I’ll hit on him and see what
he has to say, and if it is worth anything, I’ll cross post it
here, if any are interested.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, TN


#11
  Am I weak?

hi Tim,

nah, i was just wondering if you were using acetylene and if that
fuel causes more damage to the eyes than the others. i’d say you
are prudent. when i used acetylene, i used no eye protection,
except when melting.

best regards,

geo fox


#12
      I am now on my fourth bottle of oxygen and still on the
first bottle of propane. The propane bottle is 400 grams and the
oxygen bottle holds 40.1 grams.  These are the Bernzomatic type
small disposable cylinders. 

You will go broke using those disposible cylinders,. 400 grams of
Propane require 1455 grams of Oxygen for complete combustion. That’s a
little over36 cylinders!!! If you use this torch a lot, buy a small
refillable tank from a welding supply Co. Bob Williams