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Light box on the cheap


#1

Here are instructions for making your own lightbox using a cardboard
box and translucent fabric/whatever.

http://tinyurl.com/zf35p

Hardly seems worth the trouble, when you can buy an already made one
for just $44.00 at

http://www.bhphotovideo.com

and it has clips to hold the background.

But, I post the cardboard one here for students on a budget and
other die hard do it yourselfers.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#2

Elaine,

Hardly seems worth the trouble, when you can buy an already
made one for just $44.00 at http://www.bhphotovideo.com and it has
clips to hold the background." 

Sorry for the question, but I was unable to locate the item. I looked
under “Lighting” for “Lightbox”, unsuccessfully.

Could you, possibly, give additional pointers?

Thanks a lot.
Ayalla D.


#3

You might also check out the Lowel Ego system (lowel.com). It was
raved about in an article in the current Crafts Report magazine (a
fantastic reference that I HIGHLY recommend !). I just got mine, but
haven’t tried it yet. It looks like a great solution to lighting
smaller objects. I’ll report later when I fire it up.

Allan Mason
silvermason.com


#4

Sure, sorry I didn’t before, I’ve just posted about it so many
times, I didn’t want to bore people.

Here it is:

Paterson
Price : $ 47.95
Studio Light Tent - 24x24x24"
http://tinyurl.com/jrohb

They have lots of other cool new light boxes too.

Check this one out, it folds into a briefcase!
http://tinyurl.com/jqrec

Elaine
Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#5
Sorry for the question, but I was unable to locate the item. I
looked under "Lighting" for "Lightbox", unsuccessfully. 

Don’t know if this has already been answered, but the Light Boxes at
B&H Photo website, con be found in the "General Accessories"
section; “Lightboxes & Loupes & Slide Viewers”.

Hope this helps.
Jim


#6

I have a light tent, 5 panels of 6500K flouresent lighting and a
Nikon D50 (no macro lens). The photos show very nice detail and
color. BUT, independent of the background that I use - white, grey,
cloth or paper - on the photo the background is always full of color
abberations. I don’t know if this is called noise or moire or
vignette or something else.

From looking at photos of jewelry on sites on the net, I have noticed
that others have this problem also. How can I solve this? Do I need a
macro lens?

Thanks,
Lois


#7

I’m not positive I understand what you’re saying. Is it that the
object is the wrong color? It’s pretty easy to “color correct” in
photo shop and get your picture to true color. To help this, you can
place a true white in the corner of the picture, click on that for
your “correct to this color.”

Or, if you’re using film, it could be a lighting issue.

Macro lenses are great, you should have one. If that’s too expensive
you can get these magnifying lenses that work pretty well. I used
them for a long time before both getting a macro lens and going
digital.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#8

Elaine, have you used this particular light box that you are talking
about. I generally shoot outside in natural sunlight. Do the bars
cast inappropriate shadows? I was also looking at a different light
box on the same website. It’s smaller but doesn’t have the large
bars. I was wondering if anyone has had experience with this one.

Photek Digital Lighthouse Shooting Tent - Extra Small 10.5x10.5x13.5"
Item Number# PHDLHXS

It looks like it might be a good one. Looking forward to your
replies.

Lisa Hawthorne
@Lisa_Hawthorne1


#9
have you used this particular light box that you are
talking about. I generally shoot outside in natural sunlight. Do
the bars cast inappropriate shadows? 

I use the Patterson that is at B & H photo with lights, indoors. No
problems with shadows. No shadows from the bars at all. Sometimes
there’s a shadow from the item I’m shooting, but I could fix that by
adding another light (overhead).

So many folks shoot outdoors. They must live someplace much sunnier
than here.

I’m so delighted now, that I have my light tent and lights set up
all the time – all I have to do is grab the camera and go. And it
doesn’t even take up that much space.

I recommend it.

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#10

Sorry, I was not clear about the photo set-up. The camera (Nikon D50)
is digital. I use it on total manual, RAW file and do a preset white
balance before each shooting session.

In the photo the objects show good detail and are true to color. But
the black Bristol board background looks splotchy and the white
Bristol board gives concentric color waves on the background.

Most of these photos look great after 2 clicks in a photo adjustment
program. BUT, I don’t know how many of you sent an entry to Lark’s
500 earrings. For the digital images they asked that the photo be
taken in RAW and down loaded directly on the entry cd without ever
having been opened in Photoshop or an other photo program.

Lois