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Laminators for applying PnP blue


#1

Hello Orchidians,

Does anyone have any recommendations for or experiences using
laminators for applying PnP Blue to sheet metal. I’m looking for one
that would accept metal up to 18 gauge and 8.5" x 11". I’m looking
at this apache brand now.

Apache AL13P Professional 13" Wide A3 4 Roll Hot Cold Laminator for
Document and Photo: Office Products

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/157

Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Aaron
aaronwilloughby.com


#2

Aaron,

Does anyone have any recommendations for or experiences using
laminators for applying PnP Blue to sheet metal. I'm looking for
one that would accept metal up to 18 gauge and 8.5" x 11". I'm
looking at this apache brand now. 

I’m not familiar with using any type of laminator for adhering PNP.
I do know what works really well for me (and is low cost). Use
masking tape (tiny piece) to adhere the PNP to the sheet metal at
each corner. Set an electric griddle at 300 degrees and allow to
warm up (yup, the one for pancakes- easy to find at garage sales).
Put the metal on the griddle for 90 seconds. During this time,
press/dab/poke/press on the PNP/metal sheet using awadded up paper
towel (one second before moving the paper towel again). Remove the
sheet from the griddle after 90 seconds, cool and carefully pull up
each corner to check adhesion of the PNP. If necessary, return to
the griddle and repeat for areas that don’t “take.” You can also
repair any are as that don’t transfer properly using a tiny Sharpie
marker. Sharpies will survive the etching process.

You didn’t ask, but the most critical FIRST step is metal
preparation. I lightly scrub the metal (silver or copper) with
Barkeeper’s Friend, rinse, clean with Windex brand window cleaner,
rinse, dry, don’t touch surface. Then it’s ready for PNP. The PNP
seems to like a surface that’s not totally smooth.

Haven’t had a failure in ages with this method. BTW, I mostly use
PNP to transfer an intricate design to sheet for piercing. But this
method works fine for etching too.

Good luck,
Jamie


#3
Does anyone have any recommendations for or experiences using
laminators for applying PnP Blue to sheet metal. I'm looking for
one that would accept metal up to 18 gauge and 8.5" x 11". I'm
looking at this apache brand now. http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/157 

an apache is overkill unless you are doing MAJOR production work. An
iron (not using steam), an industrial heat gun (2500 degrees
potential), and a simple hot plate (double sized-abot 18" long works
particularly well if setting up a long sheet of metal, or multiple
projects). Most important when adhereing it to the metal is, like
using shrink wrap, taping down the edges to give the PnP a
start…then removing any bubbles with a brayer, or if miniscule, a
pin, and keeping the PnP stored ina dry cool place…

Before using it degrease the metal thouroughly- it will not work if
you have dirty metal- that includes using clean hands, etc…After
degreasing (or during the process) a 3M graded sanding pad/sponge
works quite well- I like the ultra-fine (white with i beleive maroon
stamping -i think its grit is graded at 6 microns) it gives a
workpiece a definite tooth but isn’t cutting like other abrasives so
very fine detail comes out perfectly…though a basic green
scotch-brite pad, if not wet-or-dry papers also do the job…Its
relative to the detail in the image as to which abrasive I choose to
use in prepping the surfaces…rer


#4

Thanks so much for the responses to my questions.

R.E. I was taught and I have actually been taking great care to prep
my metal before I apply he PnP as you recommend below. I’m mostly
finding that the fine lines (sometimes 1pt or less) and line screens
in some of the vectored artwork I create don’t hold up well to
burnishing with the iron or brayer. Especially when I apply it to a
large sheet. As well as the bubbling issue. Although I have had some
wonderful successes so far. Just not enough to make me happy, if you
know what I mean. And actually I would like to be able to produce
MAJOR quantities without struggling to get the resist down. So
overkill doesn’t sound to bad to try out if it works like you say.

But! one other concern brought to my attention by a response to my
questions. Is that laser printer companies will be fazing out carbon
based toners and the new toner that will replace it will not work
for PnP resists. She suggested a new product called stencil pro.

So I’m still sitting on the fence. But still eyeing that laminator
V.V. ;-).

Oh and FYI everybody I found CLR works as a great cleaner for
copper.

Thanks again for responding,
Aaron
aaronwilloughby.com


#5

Look at the TTS (Toner Transfer System) and resist foil system from
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/16j

I find it is significantly better than PNP. You can get line widths
down to .006" with this system. It is made for producing printed
circuit boards but works great for ferric chloride etch of copper
alloys or ferric nitrate etching of silver. Also look at their page
on contact etching ( http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/16k ), it allows
you to use way less ferric chloride and get great etch results.

James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#6
Look at the TTS (Toner Transfer System) 

Thank you James. I think I’ll give this stuff a try once I use up my
PnP. It sounds great.

Thanks,
Aaron
aaronwilloughby.com