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Katherine Palochak's Iridescent Patina


#1

Hello,

Randy mentioned the ganoksin entry by Katherine Palochak for an
iridescent LOS patina.

Katherine suggests using a formula that adds salt to ammonia combined
with the LOS. I would like to know what fumes this combination would
produce (John Burgess, are you reading this?). LOS by itself is not
healthy to breathe, but adding the ammonia and salt might make it
more unhealthy. Granted we all ventilate well when patinating, don’t
we, but how well would we need to efict those additional fumes?

Thanks for any help with this,
Linda


#2

G’day; I really don’t know much about the effect of this, but am
pretty sure it wouldn’t be too lethal, bur would suggest that care
be taken not the inhale very much of it. I have had great experience
in breathing air tainted with hydrogen sulphide gas, as I spent many
years working in teaching laboratories where the air always reeked of
the rotten egg stink. I don’t think that at 84 I can say it has done
me all that much harm! I cannot see that the addition of ammonia and
salt should make much difference. Just be careful.

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua, Nelson NZ


#3
Katherine suggests using a formula that adds salt to ammonia
combined with the LOS. I would like to know what fumes this
combination would produce (John Burgess, are you reading this?). 

Sorry I haven’t been watching my Orchid email diligently. The
addition of ammonia and salt go under the same principles of adding
mordants to fiber dyeing. Mordants intensify and/or stabilize colors.
There are recipes for other types of patinas using different mordants
that have different effects. Some bring out blues more, or reds, or
muted colors, depending on what you add to the LOS. All of my recipes
use common household ingredients for the mordants.

When I teach the patinas, I set up all the different formulas so
everyone can experiment. Almost everyone likes the irridescent patina
the best.

A good rule of thumb is if you can smell it–ventilate. If you can’t
smell it–ventilate anyway.

Katherine Palochak