Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Jump Ringer saw blade and high gauges


#1

I’ve been working with my Jump Ringer quite a bit lately and am
beginning to worry that it’s taking out more metal that I’d like it
too with the size of wire I’m working with. I’ve been working with
26g wire lately and I think the cut is taking out enough metal to
deform them enough to where it can have an effect on some of the
chains I make. I’m worried that when I attempt 28g rings that it will
be even more noticeable.

Has anyone else noticed this and/or come up with a solution? I’m
wondering if there are any thinner blades for the Jump Ringer or if
there is any danger in sanding a blade down to try and get it
thinner. I’ve already got the arbor on some bamboo runners so that it
won’t cut the rings in half. Would raising it up even more so it just
barely cuts through help?

Any input or suggestions will be helpful.

Ceryk


#2

Dear Ceryk,

The amount of distortion caused by closing a jump ring to compensate
for the width of the cut is dependent upon the diameter of the ring
and the width (kerf) of the cut. It has nothing to do with the
thickness of the wire.

Genuine Jump Ringer blades - marked “Ray Grossman Inc. Made in
U.S.A.” - are.008" thick (approximately twice the thickness of a
human hair). We arrived at this dimension after extensively testing
various thicknesses, steel alloys, tempers and tooth configurations
for durability, efficiency and usefulness in performing this
particular task. Our present blades are the result. We strongly
suggest that you do not attempt to alter the blades in any way.

There are several copies of our blades on the market manufactured by
others in various countries. Of course we cannot vouch for any of
them. You can tell whether the blades you are using are genuine if
they display our markings.

Ray Grossman
Ray Grossman Inc.


#3

You can get thinner saw blades to fit your jump ringer. Check
mscdriect.com and other industrial and machining supply companies.
Search for “jeweler’s saw”, look at 1-1/4" blades. These blades are
available with or without a keyway. I believe the jump ringer
requires a blade with a keyway (notch in blade by center hole). May
have to call to make sure you get blade with keyway. Thinner blades
will cut out less material, but are weaker and easier to break.

Norman Buck


#4

Hi Ceryk,

I've been working with my Jump Ringer quite a bit lately and am
beginning to worry that it's taking out more metal that I'd like
it too with the size of wire I'm working with. 

The blade used will only take out one blades width of metal from any
ring. I think the blade is .010" wide.

What you may be seeing is caused by the ‘spring’ in the coil. Once
the coil is cut, there’s nothing to contain the force caused by the
hardening of the wire the coil winding caused. The wider than.010"
gap between the 2 ends of the ring are the result. If you were to
measure the diameter of the coil before it was cut & the diameter of
the ring after being cut, you should find that the diameter of the
ring is the same as the diameter of the coil less the aprox .003"
caused by the metal removed by the blade

If I were you, I wouldn’t try to reduce the thickness of the blade by
sanding. Thinner blades are available from industrial supply
companies. Look for ‘jewelers slotting saws’. I’ve seen thinner
blades than .010". Be aware that thinner blades are more expensive &
have shorter lives. On industrial supplier you might try is MSC,
mscdirect.com. They have a wide selection of blades & other items.

Usual disclaimers, just a satisfied customer.

Dave


#5

Ceyrk

I've been working with my Jump Ringer quite a bit lately and am
beginning to worry that it's taking out more metal that I'd like it
too with the size of wire I'm working with. 

I have noticed the effect more with the diameter of the ring than
with the gauge of the wire used. They do make smaller blades. The one
I use for small diameter rings is only 3/4" diameter and you have to
cut slow or the blade will deflect. Lubricant is also important, as
well as restraining your rings so they do not bind. I use bees wax as
the lubricant, and painters tape to hold the wire while I cut the
rings.

Terry


#6

As usual, the “experts” have sounded off.

Myth #1. “Once the coil is cut, there’s nothing to contain the force
caused by the hardening of the wire the coil winding caused.” When
round coils are removed from the winding mandrel the tension has
been removed and they are in a relaxed state. Cutting them into jump
rings produces rings identical to those that are still uncut. Because
our MultiShape rings must be cut on the mandrel to relieve the
tension, these will expand.

Myth #2. “They do make smaller blades. The one I use for small
diameter rings is only 3/4” diameter and you have ’ to cut slow or
the blade will deflect." The writer of this claims to use 3/4"
diameter blades in a Jump Ringer for cutting small diameter rings.
Using smaller diameter blades of the same thickness will have no
effect upon the cut width (kerf). In addition, I question how a 3/4"
diameter blade will cut anything in a Jump Ringer.

Again, I must state that based on my inventing the Jump Ringer and
35 years of experience working with and improving it:

The amount of distortion caused by closing a round jump ring to
compensate for the width of the cut is dependent upon the diameter
of the ring and the width (kerf) of the cut. It has nothing to do
with the thickness of the wire, the diameter of the blade, the
hardness of the wire if its tension has been relieved before cutting
or the phase of the moon.

Ray Grossman
Ray Grossman Inc.